REVENGE PORN

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Harper's 'Revenge Porn' Bill Agenda Does Very Little To Protect Innocents

It's not cyber-bullying, it's cyber-rape. Imagine you receive an email containing a naked picture of you in a sexual position. You remember, that one that you sent your lover. The email is linked to a site where more images of your naked and vulnerable body are displayed followed by hateful comments, complete strangers tearing you apart, a cybermob virtually raping you. The site includes your full name, your home address, your contact information. Some of the commenters threaten to come to your home and rape you.
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"Revenge Porn" Needs its Own Bill

For the last year I've been speaking and writing at length about the issue Bill C-13 claims to tackle. While the bill's name in the press is the "Cyber-bullying Bill," the more specific problem addressed by components of Bill C-13 is known as "revenge porn," a term I hate for both its inaccuracy and sexualized sensationalism. After a year of arguing for legislation that criminalizes cyber-sexual assault, I cannot support the legislation as written. I cannot trade one set of civil rights for another. We should separate the components of Bill C-13 that deal directly with cyber-sexual assault from those that do not, and debate them as different pieces of legislation.
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I'm a Revenge-Porn Victim Turned Activist

I started really paying attention to local politics when an ex-boyfriend posted nude pictures of me on the Internet without my consent. Certain he had committed a crime, I went straight to the police. But the law enforcement officials I turned to for help only smirked, shrugged their shoulders, and sent me on my way.