Sexual Education

Oko_SwanOmurphy

The Miseducation of Ontario's New Sex Ed Curriculum

The curriculum is aimed at preparing kids to navigate the complicated interpersonal and sexual situations in today's hyper-sexualized world. But opponents have latched on to a number of provisions. It should be clearly understood that the new curriculum is not a "How to Manual" and that the state is not promoting a particular relationship structure. Ultimately, the government must do a better job of convincing some parents that it is responding to the changing realities. All stakeholders must feel that at least some of their concerns are heard and validated.
Getty

Most Parents Support the New Sex Ed Curriculum - With Good Reason

The misinformation about the new curriculum rivals the inaccuracies kids get about sex from their friends and our culture. Some parents are convinced that their kids will be asked to touch themselves at school. The actual curriculum stresses respecting yourself and respecting others. If you oppose it, fine. At least know what you are opposing. Parents are entitled to pass on their religious or moral beliefs to their kids, but they are not entitled to pass on their religious or moral beliefs to my child. By trying to force the Ontario government to yank the evidence-based, updated portions of the health curriculum for all Ontario kids, they are trying to prevent the majority who support this initiative from benefiting from it. And that's wrong.
PA/Alamy

As a Conservative Mom, I Still Support Sex Ed in Schools

In my province (Ontario), the government is currently revamping the sex ed curriculum, and it has the conservative circles in which I travel up in arms. They are deeply offended that the government is taking the teaching of sex ed out of the control of the parents and into the classrooms. I get that, I truly do. I want my daughter to know my beliefs and convictions about this matter, and she will, but she also needs to learn them at school. Why? Until each and every parent can tell me they have taught their children what consent is and looks like, when sex is okay, what healthy sex looks like, I will continue to support sex ed in our schools -- because there is no way I can raise my daughters in a world of kids who learned about sex from the Internet.
AP

During the Month of Love, Let's Talk About Condoms

Valentine's Day is fast approaching. What a perfect time to talk about condoms. We need to think of condoms as disease preventers, rather than just contraception. We need to think about the infections we can reduce and perhaps eliminate with the use of condoms as well as the number of people we can save.
Alamy

Why Schools Don't Need Sex Ed

As the product of private, religious schools that didn't offer classes in sexual education, I can tell you with some degree of assurance that young men do not necessarily need to be taught about sex in school -- they do just fine figuring it out for themselves. I'll go a step further: any young male or female with even the slightest modicum of common sense should instinctively comprehend the many values of practicing sex safely.
Alamy

When it Comes to Sex Ed, Less is Not More

Like fellow Huffington Post blogger Yoni Goldstein, I too figured out safe sex without classes. The problem is, not everyone is like us. Even those with the "slightest modicum of common sense" can get tripped up in the complex world of sexual health and sexual relationships. If common sense were all it took to keep one healthy, then I wouldn't see so many sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies walk through my office door. There's a lot of know: pregnancy, periods, erections, contraception, modes of infectious transmission, normal anatomical variations, and the physiology of desire, arousal and orgasm are all complex topics.