STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

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Rediscovering Vancouver's Past Through the Lens of Prolific Street Photographer Foncie Pulice

Regularly situating himself in one of five spots along Granville Street -- and at the PNE during the fair -- Foncie Pulicewould set up his camera strategically, capturing people at just the right moment. As soon as a subject stepped across a certain crack in the sidewalk, he would shoot, no focusing required. As word of Foncie spread, people would pass by purposely, completely aware he was waiting to snap their photo. Many of his photographs capture people dressed up coming out of the theatre, out for an afternoon of shopping, and in uniform during the war. Foncie not only captured portraits, he inadvertently documented the evolution of fashion, architecture, political movements and the changing face of Vancouver.
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VIFF 2013: 'Finding Vivian Maier' Reviewed

In 2007, Chicago-based historian and collector John Maloof discovered 100,000 negatives and hundreds of hours of Super 8 film footage and audio recordings which he acquired during a storage locker auction. What he didn't know was he was on the cusp of uncovering some of the most prolific American street photography of the 20th century. Vivian Maier spent next forty years working as a nanny for various families of Chicago's upper crust neighborhoods. She also spent much of her time with a Rolleiflex camera hanging from her neck, shooting people and scenes around the city, a hobby she kept quiet throughout her life. Her subjects ranged from the rich and affluent to the poor and impoverished with a penchant for politics and highlighting historical moments.