Trade

PETER PARKS via Getty Images

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Is a Dead End for Jobs

Canada used to excel at industrial strategy, but now we are satisfied with trade, and any type of trade will do. That hands-off mentality, which is at the heart of global trade deals like the recently concluded Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), goes some way to explaining why Canada's trade deficits are growing, faster with free-trade partners than other countries, and the job intensity of our exports is declining.
Shutterstock / Brian A Jackson

How the TPP Puts Canadian Privacy at Risk

One of the most troubling, but largely ignored effects of the TPP involves privacy. Privacy is not an issue most associate with a trade agreement, however, the TPP features several anti-privacy measures that would restrict the ability of governments to establish safeguards over sensitive information such as financial and health data as well as information hosted by social media services.
Colorblind via Getty Images

The Conservatives Are Betraying Canadian Jobs

This will be the first generation of Canadians in our history to be worse off than their parents. That blunt fact is the new reality of our country, where seven per cent of workers are officially jobless (and much more if hidden unemployment is included) and youth unemployment stands at over 13 per cent. And that reality is a direct result of the policies and actions of this Conservative government and the Mulroney government that came before it. Friday's headlines point to the 26,000 auto parts jobs at risk as Harper drives ahead to sign the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal.
CP

Foreign Policy Should Have Taken Centre Stage at the Munk Debate

Monday's Munk Debate is probably going to generate a lot chatter about in the small circles in Canada that actually care about foreign policy. That the three candidates themselves had trouble staying on the foreign side of issues and had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, back to foreign policy is only one indication.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Talks Shouldn't Stop for Elections

Trade negotiations are growing in importance as developed and developing countries alike increasingly realize that protectionism is not a path to prosperity. Federalism poses challenges for our trade negotiations that are exacerbated by elections at both levels of government in Canada, and among our trading partners. The electoral clock is also ticking on Japanese Diet elections next summer and on U.S. presidential and congressional elections next fall. If the machinery of trade talks ground to a halt every time an election approached, there would be no trade agreements at all -- which is, perhaps, what some people desire.

CETA's Promise of 80,000 Jobs Doesn't Add Up

Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, has repeatedly promised an 80,000 job windfall from CETA. But many economists and commentators have questioned the veracity of economic models of trade agreements saying free trade's returns have been overestimated.
Getty Images

Trade Deficit Hits Record High

OTTAWA - Canada's trade deficit grew to a record $3 billion for March as the drop in oil prices weighed on exports, Statistics Canada said Tuesday, but economists suggested things may pick up."Canada'...
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Merkel's Political Imperatives Spell Trouble for Canada

German chancellor Angela Merkel will be in Ottawa for a visit on Monday, but she may not be bringing the news Stephen Harper wants to hear when it comes to the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). That's because the German government wants to re-open CETA and amend the investor-state dispute settlement mechanism. This controversial provision allows a transnational corporation to sue a national government that passes public interest or environmental legislation that impacts their future profits.

How Small Businesses Get Big International Results

Its small share of the overall marketplace might lead many to conclude that small exporters are too small to warrant attention. That would be a great mistake. The dynamism of this segment suggests that it is already a powerful new force in Canada's economy.