Trans Pacific Partnership

CP

This Secret Trade Deal Contains Threats to Public Health

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement is being negotiated in secret, but leaked documents from the negotiations have revealed that the United States is pushing hard for strict intellectual property rules that would protect the profits of pharmaceutical companies at the expense of patients. These rules would extend patent monopolies and delay the introduction of cheaper generic drugs, allowing the big brand-name drug companies to maintain their high prices for longer periods of time. This would put lifesaving medicines out of reach for millions of poor people around the world. It could also lead to higher drug prices here at home.
CP

Tories Axe Free-Trade Guru Gig

OTTAWA - The Harper government says it is cancelling plans to hire an outside consultant to give strategic advice on how it can negotiate free trade agreements that are advantageous to the auto sector...
Huffington Post

Moving in the Right Direction on Intellectual Property Protection

Focusing only on the cost increases associated with stronger (but still lagging) intellectual property protection for pharmaceutical innovators is simplistic and wrong. It is the balance of these costs and benefits that are the ultimate determinant of whether or not Canadians are better off, not just the post-2023 increase in drug costs to provincial governments, patients, and insurers.
Getty

A Top 10 To Do List for Keeping Canada's Internet Open

Ensuring Canada has an accessible, affordable, surveillance-free, and open Internet is essential for our economy, culture, and global competitiveness. Minister James Moore has the power to take on Canada's entrenched Big Telecom giants. Here are 10 actions Minister Moore should take to leave a lasting positive legacy for Canadian Internet users.
Shutterstock

Hey, TPP Lobbyists: The Internet Belongs to All of Us

The negotiators plotting the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) think that by keeping their antics secret, they can trap countries into pushing through a damaging Internet restriction agreement without our approval. What they're forgetting is that the Internet belongs to all of us -- not just 600 unelected lobbyists.
PA

Internet Freedom: How Canadians Are Kept in the Dark

Here at OpenMedia.ca, we've already been hearing from Canadians outraged that our own Members of Parliament are still being denied access to the TPP text -- access that has now been granted to their counterparts in Washington D.C. We know that Canadians will not accept their Members of Parliament being kept in the dark
Getty Images

Don't Criminalize Our Internet Use

Legal experts are calling it "the biggest global threat to the internet." It's called the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and it will essentially criminalize free use of any website that uses copyrighted material. YouTube, Facebook, blogs with links -- all of it potentially blacklisted under this new order.

Why Is Milk So Darn Expensive? A Debate on Supply Management

When it comes to food prices, Canadians often complain about paying too much. Who or what is to blame? Martha Hall Findlay points the finger at the supply management (SM) system. But Richard Doyle says SM has little to do with the price of milk -- it just benefits the economy. What do you think? Have a look at what Hall Findlay and Doyle have to say in our online debate. Then decide whose case is more persuasive, and cast your vote...
CP

Citizens of the Internet Aren't Going Down Without a Fight

As the 15th round of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations draw to a close, the Internet freedom community is taking stock of what was said, and perhaps more significantly, what wasn't. Developments over the last few weeks suggest that the controversial treaty may be losing steam as public opposition gains momentum. The public outcry is starting to show the cracks in the push to criminalize our Internet use.