War On Drugs

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Should We Pay People Not To Take Drugs?

The War on Drugs has been a failure, and soon enough using drugs will shift from a criminal to a public health issue. But what if we paid people not to engage in harmful consumption? If we rewarded them for stopping damaging use? Couldn't the savings in all manner of costs greatly outweigh the comparatively small expense of any incentive?
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Children Should See the Horrors of Drug Use

Why not show the seedy, disgusting underbelly and sickening adverse effects drugs have on us feeble humans? Images of a deviated septum, busted arm veins, chronic bleeding noses, rotten teeth, fetal effects, undernourished human bodies, etc. Horrifying images of what drug use has on the human body. Visceral images that make one think "that's repulsive, I'll never do that." We usher in a movement that illustrates and encourages dialogue about the revolting face of what drugs do: destroy the human spirit, decay our bodies, ruin families, and ultimately lead us to an early grave. There is NO glamour in drug use, no matter what Kanye is singing about.
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Too Many Politicians Suffer From Drug Policy Abuse

Last week, MPs debated Bill C-2 -- an Act to Amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. The primary purpose of the bill is to obstruct the establishment of safe injection sites in Canada, despite over a decade of successful harm reduction at Vancouver's Insite. This is just one example of how politicians of all stripes get drug policy wrong.
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Your Drug Addiction Is Costing Poor People Their Lives

People sure love their drugs. There are high costs, however, for this international appetite for drugs. And it's usually the poor and disenfranchised who pay these costs. The cost of the global appetite for drugs is high and the burden is disproportionately felt by the poor. It's the man who passes out in front of my apartment on a weekly basis. It's the victims of beheadings in Mexico. It's the families left impoverished while a small, violent elite makes millions. Drugs aren't cool. Or edgy. This is supply and demand at its most brutal and the poor are the ones paying the price.
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Trudeau on Pot Is a Political Highlight

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau is right that legalizing, and then regulating, marijuana is the right thing to do. It will save money and it will help keep weed away from kids. Prohibition isn't working to keep kids safe from today's supercharged weed. Legalization and regulation will.
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America Has More Reasonable Drug Laws Than Canada: What the Hell?

It beats me why so many American conservatives have smartened up about when it makes sense to send people to jail when Canadian conservatives -- at least the ones who count -- clearly haven't. The average cost of keeping a Canadian in prison for a year is more than $113,000, which is money well spent for violent offenders. But why spend it locking up minor drug offenders? Why are we hell-bent on this backwards way of thinking?

Harper Admits He Saw Marijuana Once

In a candid interview with CBC's George Stroumoumbouloupoulus, Prime Minister Stephen Harper says he has close-up and personal knowledge of the illegal drug industry having once spotted a baggie and j...
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Opioids: "Addiction Is Not a Disease of Society's Margins"

Our ability to manage pain through pharmaceuticals has progressed by leaps and bounds. The advent of powerful new drugs has helped thousands manage sometimes debilitating pain and regain productive function. But along with this increased capacity to treat pain has come undesired side effects including addiction, dependency, and a growing death toll. Let us be clear: addiction is not a disease of society's margins, of the criminally inclined or of the morally destitute. Addiction to prescription drugs is a public health issue that affects all kinds of people and requires multiple sectors and stakeholders to work together in addressing a chronic, relapsing condition, not bad behaviour.
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Like Bad Wine, U.S. Foreign Policy Gets Worse With Time

We now see every week the crumbling of foreign policy of the United States. The War on Terror was not without mistakes, but the War on Drugs has been a disaster in every respect. Only 20 years ago, the U.S. bestrode the world, the only super power, strong by any measurement. Today it is quavering, waffling, semi-bankrupt, lurching from one mistaken and often hypocritical policy to the next.
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Canadian Politicians: Lie First, Apologize Later

Lies and miscalculations rule the day in Canadian politics and we don't seem too bothered. Who needs data, facts, or expertise to make hundreds of billions worth of decisions? Since lies seem to work, politicians scatter them liberally. Candidates spew promises they have no intention or clue how to keep. We are repeatedly shocked to see them broken.