THE BLOG

These Are The Faces Of Resilience In South Sudan

11/10/2015 04:10 EST | Updated 11/10/2016 05:12 EST

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By Brett Tarver, World Vision Canada

Proud perseverance. Women who have lost their husbands and sons to conflict have bound together in solidarity at a camp for internally displaced people supported by World Vision and the Government of Canada. In most locations, 90 per cent of camp occupants are women and children. Twic County, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

South Sudan is a tough place to live. The world's newest nation is less than five years old and it's been ranked as the most fragile country on earth for the past two years. The region has been devastated by conflict for decades, combined with severe under-development that can make each day a struggle for survival. Maternal and child mortality, illiteracy, poor infrastructure, and malaria are simply off the charts in South Sudan.

Fragile countries like South Sudan are increasingly home to the greatest burden of poverty, especially for women and children. Yet the proud people who live there hold great potential and targeted, effective aid is building more faces of resilience.

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Unbeatable smile. A boy still finds joy in losing a tooth, at a camp for internally displaced people. South Sudan has been a priority country as part of Canada's Muskoka Initiative for maternal, newborn, child health. Twic County, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Afternoon respite. A baby rests from the sweltering 40C heat, in the shade of a tree. The child's family recently fled conflict to take refuge in a camp for internally displaced people. More than 1.6 million South Sudanese people have left their home due to conflict, half of which are children. Twic County, South Sudan. Photo/Brett Tarver

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Finding solutions. Although blind, this mother has been able to provide shelter for her family after being welcomed into a camp for internally displaced families. Approximately 6.5 million people in South Sudan are currently affected by conflict. Twic County, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Moment of serenity. A woman relaxes with a pipe at a camp for internally displaced people. Twic County, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Healthy confidence. A young woman carries herself with pride after a visit to a hospital administered by World Vision. Nearly 75 per cent of South Sudan is under 30 years old. Kuajok, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Mothers' group. Mothers gather in the shade to get practical, life-saving tips on health, nutrition and WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene). Tonj North, South Sudan. Photo/Brett Tarver

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Cool comfort. A young man receives treatment for severe burns at a hospital administered by World Vision. Nearly 75 per cent of South Sudan is under 30 years old. Kuajok, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Life-saving care. A young girl is treated for malaria in a hospital administered by World Vision. Approximately 450,000 children die from malaria every year. Kuajok, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Sisterly love. A young girl gives her sibling a squeeze outside of a health centre that now has a consistent supply of life-saving drugs thanks in part to funds from the Canadian government. South Sudan continues to have one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Alek, South Sudan. Photo/Brett Tarver

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The fun of learning. A young student getting a health checkup at a health care facility administered by World Vision with funds from the Canadian government. More education leads to better health for women and babies. Girls that receive more education are more likely to marry later, use contraception, avoid sexually transmitted infections and postpone pregnancy. They are healthier themselves and have healthier children. Alek, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Face of wisdom in one of the world's toughest places. On September 25 the United Nations adopted new sustainable development goals which go further than ever before to promote health for the world's most vulnerable people. Alek, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Ultimate survivor. An elderly man takes a break from the mid-day sun in Alek, South Sudan. South Sudan's Per Capita Gross National Income is US$960, an average of less than $3 per day. Alek, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Enduring traditions. A man wields a traditional spear in Alek, South Sudan. After decades of civil war, South Sudan became a republic on July 9, 2011. Overall, 99 per cent of southeners voted for secession. Alek, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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A partially-blind woman receives treatment at a hospital funded in part by the Canadian government. In 2012, Canada joined Australia, the EU and Sweden to form the Health Pooled Fund which aims to reach 4.2 million people with much needed health services. Kuajok, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Infectious smile. A shaman participates in a World Vision health day. World Vision has encouraged South Sudanese people to embrace the benefits of modern medicine while still holding on to traditional beliefs. Lurcuk, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Bowed but not broken. Approximately 4.6 million people in South Sudan (about 40 per cent of the population) are severely food insecure as of July 2015. Lurcuk, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Graceful elegance. A young woman attends a World Vision health day promoting nutrition and hygiene. In South Sudan, many adolescents are stunted: their physical and brain development has been restricted due a nutritionally inadequate diet. Lurcuk, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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Survival skills. A young man looks warily at the camera. Communal violence as well as clashes between armies, rebel groups and tribal militias is widespread throughout the country. The engagement of men in the health of their families is integral for them to not just survive, but to thrive. Tonj North, South Sudan. Photo/Andre Forget

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