NEWS
11/13/2015 04:16 EST | Updated 11/13/2016 00:12 EST

Five stories in the news today, Nov. 13

Five stories in the news today, Nov. 13, from The Canadian Press:

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TRUDEAU SET TO LEAVE FOR FIRST FOREIGN TRIP AS PM

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves tonight for his first major foray into foreign policy — the G20 summit in Turkey this weekend. An expert on G8 and G20 summits says Trudeau could not have picked a better international meeting that fits with the agenda that brought him to power. John Kirton on the University of Toronto says the key planks of Trudeau's platform, such as spurring growth through deficit-financed infrastructure or tackling climate change, will make a good fit with the overall G20 agenda.

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PM TRUDEAU TO HOST PREMIERS FOR CLIMATE TALKS

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has invited provincial and territorial leaders to Ottawa to discuss Canada's climate change plans ahead of an international climate conference in Paris. He had previously invited them to join him at COP21, the UN-sponsored summit that begins Nov. 30 in the French capital. Trudeau will meet the premiers Nov. 23, just before heading to London for an audience with the Queen, a Commonwealth leaders' meeting in Malta and the Paris climate talks.

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PROMPT DECISION ON COMMUNISM MEMORIAL PROMISED

Heritage Minister Melanie Joly is promising a prompt decision on plans for a controversial memorial to victims of communism. Joly says she'll decide on the project's fate after talking to all stakeholders. The Harper government approved erecting the monument on a parcel of land between the Supreme Court of Canada and the Library and Archives Canada, on Wellington Street just a few blocks west of Parliament Hill. But, as Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson noted after a meeting with Joly, the proposed site "is not acceptable to anyone."

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EXPERTS: KEYSTONE OIL WON'T NECESSARILY RIDE THE RAILS

Industry watchers say rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline doesn't mean much of the oil that would have flowed through the project will end up moving on trains instead. Alta Corp. Capital analyst Dirk Lever says rail will play a role, but export volumes have a lot to do with oil prices and what happens with oilsands projects. Lever points out shipping by rail is expensive so low oil prices would make it less palatable to oil companies.

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WHOOPING COUGH RATES RISE IN PARTS OF CANADA

Several provinces and at least one territory are experiencing outbreaks of pertussis, better known as whooping cough, and public health officials are encouraging Canadians of all ages to make sure their vaccinations are up to date. The bacterial infection, which often but not always causes a "whoop" sound when breathing or coughing, is particularly dangerous for very young babies, say doctors. The disease can lead to hospitalization and, in rare cases, death.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY ...

— Trial continues in Toronto for Const. James Forcillo, charged in the streetcar shooting death of Sammy Yatim.

— Trial continues in Toronto for Everton Biddersingh, charged with first-degree murder in the death of his daughter.

— Coroner's inquest continues into the 2008 death of seven-year-old Katelynn Sampson at the hands of her guardians.

— Sophie, Countess of Wessex, and Ontario Lt.-Gov. Elizabeth Dowdeswell will tour The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto.

— Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard meets with the governors of Massachusetts and Maine in Boston. 

— Manitoba Opposition Leader Brian Pallister will give an alternative throne speech to outline Progressive Conservative priorities.

— A plea is expected in the case of Anaheim Ducks defenceman Clayton Stoner, charged with five counts under the Wildlife Act after a grizzly bear was killed on the B.C. central coast in May, 2013.

 

The Canadian Press