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Canada's spy agency wants ban in terror trial for secrets of national security

VANCOUVER — Canada's spy agency is back in court asking that information about its involvement in a British Columbia terrorism probe be kept secret from the public.

For the second time in weeks, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service has asked British Columbia Supreme Court Justice Catherine Bruce to allow secret hearings into whether the RCMP entrapped a couple found guilty of terrorism.

John Nuttall and Amanda Korody were found guilty of plotting to bomb the B.C. legislature on Canada Day 2013, but their conviction hasn't been entered while their lawyers argue that police manipulated them into committing the crime.

This time the spy agency says some of the information is sensitive enough to national security that part of the proceedings should also exclude both defence and Crown lawyers.

CSIS lawyer Donaree Nygard says the courtroom's public gallery should be closed because even the most well-intentioned lawyers could let slip confidential information.

Lawyer Dan Burnett is representing a group of six media outlets fighting to keep the hearing public, saying an in-camera order is too extreme and that a publication ban would suffice for at least part of the hearing.

The Canadian Press

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