NEWS
04/26/2016 17:20 EDT | Updated 04/27/2017 01:12 EDT

The Tuesday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Highlights from the news file for Tuesday, April 26:

TRUDEAU SAYS 'NO' TO TERRORIST RANSOMS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada "does not and will not" pay ransom to terrorists, either directly or indirectly. Trudeau found himself responding to more questions about the death of Canadian John Ridsdel, who was killed by Abu Sayyaf militants in the Philippines after seven months of captivity. "Paying ransom for Canadians would endanger the lives of every single one of the millions of Canadians who live work and travel around the globe every single year," said Trudeau.

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CORPORATE CANADA USING TAX HAVENS: New figures on direct foreign investment released by Statistics Canada show that corporate Canada has been pouring billions of dollars more into offshore tax havens. Canadians for Tax Fairness crunched the numbers and found that Canadian corporations have invested more than $270 billion in the top 10 tax haven destinations for Canadian capital over the past 15 years, with investment up 17 per cent over 2014. Barbados was the top destination, attracting $79.9 billion in total, up 14 per cent over the previous year.

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ABORIGINAL INCARCERATION IN CANADA: Figures from the Justice Department paint a dark picture of the state of indigenous incarceration, with aboriginals seriously overrepresented in the youth criminal justice system. Data recently provided by the department to brief Justice Minister Jody Wilson Raybould says indigenous youth account for only seven per cent of the overall population, but make up 41 per cent of those entering the justice system. The documents also say the problem has ballooned over the last decade and point to bias in the policing, justice and corrections systems.

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PARENTS GUILTY IN SON'S MENINGITIS DEATH: The parents of a toddler who died of meningitis have been found guilty of failing to provide him with the necessaries of life. David and Collet Stephan were charged after 19-month-old Ezekiel died in March 2012. The couple testified at their trial in Lethbridge, Alta., that they believed their son had croup or flu, so they treated him for 2 1/2 weeks with remedies that included smoothies with hot peppers, garlic, onions and horseradish. He eventually stopped breathing and died after being rushed to hospital.

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FATHER CHARGED WITH MURDER OF DAUGHTER: A Newfoundland father has been charged with the first-degree murder of his five-year-old daughter after her body was found in a burned-out home. Trent Butt, 37, will also face an arson charge in a case that police say has proven difficult for the small communities of Carbonear and Harbour Grace. "It's quite stressful for the fire officials, the paramedics and our officers," said Harbour Grace RCMP Staff Sgt. Howard Gale. "They're all being affected by it."

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MOUNTIE ACCUSED OF STARVING SON: A Mountie accused of torturing and starving his 11-year-old son told an Ottawa court he was in a constant battle to control the boy's bad behaviour — a battle that ultimately resulted in him physically restraining and hurting the boy. But in a second day of testimony in his own defence, the man, whose name cannot be published in order to protect the boy's identity, said his wife was never present when he "hit, burned or slapped" his son.

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ALBERTA PREMIER HEADING TO WASHINGTON: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says she is going to Washington, D.C. mainly to spread the word on her government's climate-change plan. Notley says Alberta taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint is a story that needs to be emphasized with decision-makers and those with reach and influence. The premier is to fly out Wednesday and meet with elected officials and David MacNaughton, Canadian ambassador to the United States. She is to give a speech at the Center for Canadian Studies at John Hopkins University on Thursday.

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BANK GOVERNOR: LOWER RATES THE NEW NORMAL: Bank of Canada governor Stephen Poloz is recommending pension funds get ready for a new normal: neutral interest rates lower than they were before the financial crisis. Poloz told a Wall Street audience that the fate of neutral rates — the levels he said will prevail once the world economy recovers — remain unknown, but they will almost certainly be lower than previously thought. The central banker made the comment during a question-and-answer period that followed his speech on global trade growth.

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CLINTON MAY FOLLOW TRUDEAU CABINET LEAD: Justin Trudeau's gender-equal cabinet could soon be replicated in the United States, depending on the outcome of the current American election. The poll-leading presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, appeared to indicate her intention to follow suit when asked about it in a televised event on the eve of Tuesday's five northeastern primaries.

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TRUMP ASKED ABOUT POSSIBLE EXODUS IF HE WINS: Donald Trump has a message for some of the celebrities musing about leaving for Canada if he's elected president: Don't let the door hit you on the way out. The billionaire candidate expressed delight Tuesday when asked about the phenomenon of famous Americans talking about becoming political exiles if he's elected. He said he'd be glad to make it a reality. "I'll be doing a great service to our country. I have to (win). Now, it's much more important. "

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LIVERPOOL FANS 'UNLAWFULLY KILLED' IN 1989: The 96 Liverpool soccer fans who were crushed to death in overcrowded sections at Hillsborough Stadium in 1989 were "unlawfully killed" in a disaster caused by police actions, a jury concluded Tuesday. The police force responsible for the stadium in the northern English city of Sheffield said "we unequivocally accept the verdict," while apologizing for their failings to families who have spent 27 years campaigning for the police to be officially blamed.

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'HORROR DENTIST' SENTENCED IN FRANCE: A French court has found a man dubbed the "horror dentist" guilty of assault and fraud and sentenced him to eight years in prison. Dutch dentist Jacobus Van Nierop, 51, had fled to Canada in late 2013. He was arrested in New Brunswick in 2014 and then ordered extradited. The court in Nevers, France, barred him from practising dentistry for life. About 100 plaintiffs had filed complaints against Van Nierop, ranging from having multiple healthy teeth removed, drill bits left in their gums and teeth, abscesses, recurrent infections and misshapen mouths after he did work on patients.

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PRINCE DID NOT HAVE A WILL: Prince's sister believes the superstar musician didn't have a will and has asked a Minnesota court to appoint a special administrator to oversee his multimillion-dollar estate, according to court documents filed Tuesday that could signal a looming fight over Prince's assets. Tyka Nelson, Prince's only surviving full sibling, said in the court filing that immediate action was necessary to manage Prince's business interests following his death last week. The documents don't estimate how much his estate may be worth.

 

 

 

The Canadian Press