NEWS
06/03/2016 13:51 EDT | Updated 06/04/2017 01:12 EDT

The Friday news briefing: An at-a-glance survey of some top stories

Highlights from the news file for Friday, June 3:

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TRUDEAU WAGS FINGER AT CHINA: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada has expressed its "dissatisfaction" with China after the Chinese foreign minister publicly berated a Canadian journalist earlier this week. Trudeau says freedom of the press is something that is very important to him and it's the media's role to ask tough questions. The incident occurred at an Ottawa news conference. Foreign Minister Wang Yi blasted a journalist from the web outlet IPolitics who asked about China's human rights record, calling the question "irresponsible."

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TRUDEAU SAYS NATIVE LANGUAGE KEY TO PREVENTING SUICIDE: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says restoring indigenous languages is key to preventing youth suicides in First Nation communities but stopped short of promising to recognize them as official languages. He told a town hall organized by the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network in Winnipeg that languages are at the core of indigenous culture and identity. He said communities that do a better job of teaching their own language and culture see big drops  in suicide rates.

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ASSISTED DEATH BILL WON'T PASS BY MONDAY: There's now no way the federal government is going to meet Monday's Supreme Court deadline to enact legislation on doctor-assisted dying. Senators have voted to adopt the legislation, known as Bill C-14, in principle and to send it to the Senate committee on legal and constitutional affairs. However, after the vote, the upper chamber opted to adjourn until Tuesday — the day after the high court's deadline. That decision followed a news conference by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who said he was still hopeful the controversial bill could be passed in time.

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PROPERTY DAMAGE PARAMEDICS IN FORT MAC: Employees are returning to surreal scenes at their workplaces in Fort McMurray. Workers at one bar came back to find food that had been left on plates when patrons were forced to flee. A restoration company called PuroClean, which calls itself "the paramedics of property damage," had about a dozen workers on site Friday tearing into the mammoth job of getting the bar back up to snuff. The company says spoiled food needed to be chucked out and dishes, utensils, pots and pans sanitized.

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PETRO-CAN RUNNING ON EMPTY:  Suncor's Petro-Canada stations across Western Canada are running short on fuel because of a refinery outage in Edmonton and the Fort McMurray wildfires. Suncor says the cumulative effects of lower crude production because of the fires and the Edmonton outage mean the company has been producing less diesel and especially less gasoline for its retail operations. There are temporary shortages at Petro-Canada stations in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and in British Columbia's Interior.

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INUIT FURIOUS OVER RUSSIAN ROCKET: Russia has angered Inuit in two countries and raised sovereignty concerns over its plans to drop part of a rocket potentially carrying highly toxic fuel into some of the most productive waters of the Canadian Arctic. The Inuit Circumpolar Commission says it's a vital body of water that is integral to the food supply of Inuit communities in Greenland and Canada. On Saturday, a stage of a Russian satellite-launching rocket is expected to fall into Baffin Bay between Ellesmere Island and Greenland outside Canadian territorial waters, but within seas over which Canada has economic control.

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HIGH-PROFILE NEW DEMOCRAT RULES OUT LEADERSHIP RUN: New Democrat MP Nathan Cullen says he won't take another stab at seeking his party's leadership to take over from Tom Mulcair. The British Columbia MP says he wants to spend more time with his family and focus his political energy on the electoral reform and climate change files. Cullen ran against against Mulcair in the party's 2012 leadership race and ended up third behind runner-up Brian Topp.

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MULRONEY PREDICTS NHL TEAM FOR QUEBEC CITY: Former prime minister Brian Mulroney says he believes one day NHL hockey will return to Quebec City, but not in the immediate future. Mulroney made the comments today moments before receiving an honorary degree from Universite de Montreal. He is chairman of the board of directors of Quebecor (TSX:QBR.B), which has applied for an NHL expansion franchise for the province's capital city. NHL commissioner Gary Bettman recently said the league's Board of Governors should have a decision on a possible expansion by June 22. Mulroney says the low Canadian dollar is a factor in the decision-making process that plays against Quebec City.

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MORE THAN 100 MIGRANTS DIE IN SINKING: A spokesperson for Libya's Red Crescent says the bodies of 107 migrants -- almost all from African countries -- have been recovered after their boat sank off the coast this week. Warmer weather has seen a recent surge in the number of boats carrying refugees, with smugglers packing people into unsafe vessels by the tens of thousands to cross the Mediterranean Sea to reach Europe. About 340 people were rescued after their boat sank south of the Greek island of Crete.   

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MUHAMMAD ALI HOSPITALIZED: Muhammad Ali is in a Phoenix area hospital with what two people familiar with his condition say may be more serious problems than his previous hospital stays. The 74-year-old boxing great is fighting respiratory issues that are complicated by the Parkinson's that he was diagnosed with in the 1980s. The Associated Press spoke with the two people separately who described Ali's condition as concerning to family members. A spokesman for Ali says the boxer is in fair condition, and a brief hospital stay was expected.

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