NEWS
12/03/2016 15:00 EST | Updated 12/04/2017 00:12 EST

Athletes of the Week: Sarah and Amy Potomack

Names: Sarah Potomak and Amy Potomak

Age: 18 and 17 respectively

Hometown: Aldergrove

Latest claim to fame: The Potomaks are the first sister duo to be named to the Sr. National Women's team. They'll play in a two-game series against the U.S. later this month.

Story: Think Daniel and Henrik — only younger, female and not identical twins — and you get a sense of the on-ice chemistry between Sarah and Amy.

Their brand of Sedinery — we'll call it "Potomagic" — was born of many happy hours playing road hockey with four older brothers, and many years skating on the same line in minor hockey.

"We just always know where the other is when we're on the ice together," said Amy. "When we were little, we would always come up with plays in our backyard then go on the ice and practice those plays."

"Both of us have offensive ability," said Sarah. "I do like to set the plays up, and Amy is a bigger body so she's able to get to the net a little easier."

X factor on ice

Having an instinct for each other gives the sisters an X factor on the ice, but sometimes the familiarity breeds friction.

"We do bicker on the bench sometimes," said Sarah. 

"Especially if one of us makes a bad play," laughed Amy. "But it's all out of love."

As newcomers to Team Canada, the sisters are well aware that the games against the U.S. are an audition for bigger things, like the 2017 World Championships and the 2018 Olympics.

"This series is obviously huge for me and Amy to play well and prove ourselves," said Sarah. "I'm a bit nervous, but it's more exciting."

'I'm just going to grab it'

"It's something that I've been waiting for forever so I'm just going to grab it and play the best I can," she said.

"It's really cool," said Amy. "[Marie-Philip] Poulin and [Natalie] Spooner are two players who Sarah and I looked up to a lot growing up. And now to be in the same room as them and watch them play and see their habits, it's extremely helpful."

While it's hard not to speak of the sisters as a single unit, their individual credentials speak volumes about their talent.

Last year, Sarah led the University of Minnesota to the NCAA Frozen Four title, while being named MVP of the tournament and NCAA rookie of the year. This season, she continues to light it up with 11 goals and 16 assists in 16 games.

Last month, Amy was named MVP of the Canadian U18 National Championships for a second straight year. Last week, she announced she will play major midget boys hockey with the West Valley Hawks while continuing to captain the Pacific Steelers of the Junior Women's Hockey League where she is putting up over two and a half points per game. 

B.C. breakthrough?

The sisters stand to make a little bit of history for female hockey in this province. In the 28 year existence of the women's national team, only one B.C. player has ever been named to a world championship or Olympic team — goalie Danielle Dube.

"The players coming out of B.C. are just getting stronger and stronger," said Amy. "The programs, the major midget teams, the academies, and with UBC doing really well, it helps inspire young girls."

"Ontario and Quebec are usually dominant for the national team," said Sarah. "It's pretty incredible for us to make this team."

The first game of what Hockey Canada is calling the December Series goes Dec. 17 in Plymouth, Mich., with the second game two nights later in Sarnia, Ont.