BUSINESS
03/16/2018 11:12 EDT | Updated 03/16/2018 11:13 EDT

Moo Nay Farms, Shubenacadie Steak Producer, Sparks Backlash With 'Man's Day' Ad Campaign

Moo Nay Farms ran a Facebook promotion it called "Steak and Blowjob" Man's day.

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SHUBENACADIE, N.S. — A Nova Scotia livestock farmer's racy marketing campaign has set off a social-media slugfest over beef and a satirical holiday for men that critics say does little but reinforce sexist stereotypes.

Moo Nay Farms in Shubenacadie posted several pictures of steak on its Facebook page earlier this week as part of a promotion it called "Steak and Blowjob" Man's day.

The post offers up tenderloin, sirloin and blade steaks, "For all the last minute, yet still proactive, ladies out there, and all the hopeful men."

"This day only comes once a year and we hope you choose to celebrate with the best quality steak ... the rest is up to you, ladies," it says of the March 14 event. "Remember ... Grass fed, makes you better in bed!"

Talk about alienating a huge swath of customers and potential customers.

It took little time for the backlash to start.

One poster said she would boycott the farm and referred to the language in the post as "misogynistic, sexist and disgusting."

Ayla-Monic M. McKay responded by saying it would likely turn away some customers who objected to the message.

"Talk about alienating a huge swath of customers and potential customers. I know who I'll be explicitly telling people not to support," she wrote. "Nothing like outdated misogynistic stereotypes for a laugh! Ugh."

Says it prefers its clientele to 'have a sense of humour'

Others, however, began filling up the page with messages of support while criticizing people offended by the post, giving it 154 shares and hundreds of likes.

"The more people who complain about this post the larger the order I'm going to place," Josh Paul wrote in response to the criticism. "Keep it up moo nay and you'll only have to work one day a year."

Many simply said people should lighten up and go along with the fictional holiday that was started in the United States as a response to Valentine's Day and celebrated on March 14.

For its part, the farm responded on Facebook that it prefers its clientele to "have a sense of humour."

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