NEWS
04/09/2018 15:37 EDT | Updated 04/11/2018 20:34 EDT

Humboldt Bus Crash Investigation Could Take Months, Experts Say

Analysts will interview survivors and witnesses and run computer simulations of the fatal collision.

Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press
The wreckage of a fatal crash outside of Tisdale, Sask., is seen on April, 7, 2018.

The trailer of the truck lay nearby in a shattered mess, with bags of its peat moss cargo scattered all around. The tractor part was intact, lying on its passenger side.

The semi truck would have had to yield to a stop sign before crossing over the highway the hockey bus was travelling on. There is a stand of trees on the southeast corner of the intersection, limiting visibility of the approach on both roads.

In the case of the Humboldt accident, "the scene talks a lot," according to former Quebec provincial police crash expert Pierre Bellemare.

Bellemare, who retired in 2005 after 25 years of service, says that since the road travelled by the bus didn't have a stop sign, investigators will have to determine whether the semi truck came to a full stop at the intersection.

Jonathan Hayward/CANADIAN PRESS
Members of the RCMP place flowers at the intersection of a crash site near Tisdale, Sask. on April, 8, 2018.

That, he said, will involve speaking to survivors and witnesses, confirming the truck's speed, load, and mechanical condition, and checking for anything that may have impeded the driver's field of vision.

Investigators will also look at the safety of the intersection where the crash occurred.

Jason Young, the president of Toronto-based reconstruction company Advantage Forensics, says analysts will look at the intersection's history of recent accidents and make sure the road meets Canadian design standards for safety and visibility.

"We're looking at the visibility across the corners, the visibility the driver on the side road has of approaching vehicles in both directions," said Young, who has not viewed the site and is not involved in the investigation.

Humboldt Broncos/Twitter
Humboldt Broncos hockey players are seen in a team photo. Fifteen people on the team bus have died after the vehicle they were travelling in collided with a semi-truck on Friday near Tisdale, Sask.

If traffic conditions and the accident history warrant, municipalities could eventually change an intersection to a four-way stop or a traffic signal, he said.

Some experts, he said, are also recommending increasing the number of roundabouts at intersections as a way to avoid often deadly T-bone collisions.

All three experts agree that a major investigation such as the Humboldt one is likely to take time, involving input from police, reconstruction experts, government agencies, mechanics, engineers, and eventually the Crown.

You can imagine what those members who are first on scene, and those who came subsequently, saw.Rob Creasser.

"This is something you don't want to rush," Creasser said. "You want to do a very thorough investigation, and you're not counting on only you."

He's hoping the public will spare a thought for the front-line workers, many of whom are likely struggling with the trauma they've witnessed.

"You can't unsee something," he said. "You can imagine what those members who are first on scene, and those who came subsequently, saw."

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