POLITICS
07/06/2018 14:45 EDT | Updated 07/06/2018 15:06 EDT

Lisa MacLeod: Trudeau Can Work With Ontario On Asylum Seekers Or ‘Against Us’

She is pushing for resources to stem a "looming crisis."

Lisa MacLeod speaks to the media at Queen's Park on Jan. 26, 2018.
Richard Lautens/Getty Images
Lisa MacLeod speaks to the media at Queen's Park on Jan. 26, 2018.

TORONTO — Ontario faces a "looming crisis" next month if Ottawa doesn't help find space for refugees and asylum seekers currently sheltered in university dorms, the provincial government said Friday.

Lisa MacLeod, provincial minister in charge for immigration, urged Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to commit federal resources to relieve overcrowding in Toronto's shelter system.

About 800 refugee claimants and asylum seekers are staying in Toronto college residences that must be vacated on Aug. 9 before students return to campus.

"Those college dormitories are for students who are returning in the fall," MacLeod said. "That space will be needed. ... This is something that is very urgent. It is pressing. We have a looming crisis."

MacLeod said she has submitted a request for funding and a list of federally owned spaces in the city where the people could be housed.

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The federal government has so far offered $11 million in funding to the province, but MacLeod said that will cover a fraction of the costs incurred in Toronto alone.

"What I'm simply saying to the federal government (is), you have resources, you have assets in the city of Toronto, you're going to need to use those," she said. "We're at capacity now."

MacLeod's comments come a day after Premier Doug Ford said Trudeau had put a strain on local and provincial services by encouraging foreigners to come to Canada illegally.

Ford issued a statement just before his first meeting with Trudeau on Thursday, saying the federal government should foot 100 per cent of the bill for resettling the newcomers.

MacLeod repeated Friday that she thinks there has been "irresponsibility on the part of the federal government" by inviting "illegal" border crossing but declined to offer alternatives.

"I am not going to provide Justin Trudeau with solutions," she said. "He has a government that he can run, and he can choose to work us or he can choose to work against us."

Earlier Friday, Toronto Mayor John Tory said municipalities across Ontario have offered to help handle the influx of asylum seekers, saying they have jobs available for refugee claimants and asylum seekers.

Tory meet with Trudeau on Friday morning to discuss the issue.

In a radio interview before the meeting, the prime minister condemned leaders who engage in anti-migrant rhetoric.

Conservative politicians playing 'dangerous game': PM

"Unfortunately conservative politicians here and around the world are playing a very dangerous game with something that shouldn't be fodder for division," Trudeau said on CBC Radio's Metro Morning.

"Canadians are supportive of immigration and accepting refugees. They need to be reassured, as they can be, that we have a system in place that is going through all the processes."

Meanwhile, some of those tasked with helping to house the newcomers say the disagreement between Ottawa and Ontario over the issue has left them in limbo.

Sojourn House, a Toronto shelter, launched a program to resettle families in March due to demand, said its executive director, Debbie Hill-Corrigan.

Hill-Corrigan said she's now unsure whether the provincial government will continue to support to program as part of a three-year agreement signed with the previous administration.

The shelter has been operating at capacity since November 2017, she said.

With files from Liam Casey and Alanna Rizza.