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Halifax Surgeon Daniel McNeely Fixes Little Boy's Teddy Bear, Captures Internet's Heart

It's just so pure.
Halifax-based neurosurgeon Daniel McNeely repairs a child's teddy bear while the patient was recovering from surgery.
Halifax-based neurosurgeon Daniel McNeely repairs a child's teddy bear while the patient was recovering from surgery.

He's only tweeted once, but he did it with the precision and accuracy of a neurosurgeon.

Halifax's Dr. Daniel McNeely went viral over the weekend after tweeting a photo of a very important, high-stakes surgical operation ... on a teddy bear.

"Patient asks if I can also fix teddy bear just before being put off to sleep ... how could I say no?" McNeely wrote in the post, which included two photos of the neurosurgeon poised over a wee teddy bear that was wearing a teeny-tiny mask.

Oh, and you guys? The bear belongs to an eight-year-old boy and teddy's name is "Little Baby."

BRB crying forever.

The human patient, Jackson McKie, has been a patient of McNeely's since he was an infant, the Canadian Press reported. McKie, who lives with his family in Summerside, P.E.I., has a cyst on his brain and a chronic condition called hydrocephalus.

He brought Little Baby (yep, still crying) into the operating room last Thursday and — right before he was put under — asked McNeely if he'd fix his furry friend up, too.

"I thought if there was something I could do to help make him feel better, it seemed like a simple gesture and I was only too happy to oblige," McNeely said Tuesday.

The doctor asked the nurses to prepare a small table with some tools, and he used leftover stitches from McKie's procedure to patch up the bear.

McNeely's tweet of Little Baby's surgery (his first operation on a toy) — which was incidentally also his first tweet ever on the account @pdmcneely — has been widely shared across social media, the country, and really did a number on our collective heartstrings.

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