NEWS
02/25/2019 11:47 EST | Updated 02/25/2019 11:50 EST

Saskatchewan Coroner's Service Calls For Seatbelts On Buses After Humboldt Broncos Bus Crash

Last April, a semi-truck barrelled through a stop sign at a rural intersection and was struck by the Broncos' bus.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
A memorial for the 2018 crash where 16 people died and 13 injured when a truck collided with the Humboldt Broncos hockey team bus, is shown at the crash site on Jan. 30, 2019 in Tisdale, Sask.

REGINA — Saskatchewan's coroner's service has released its report into the Humboldt Broncos bus crash and it calls for tougher enforcement of trucking rules and mandatory seatbelts on highway buses.

The office has made recommendations to six different government agencies after reviewing the crash.

The coroner also says the Ministry of Highways should review its policy on signs at intersections and Saskatchewan Government Insurance should implement mandatory truck-driver training.

There is a recommendation that the chief coroner create a mass fatality plan and that the Saskatchewan Health Authority review how it identifies the dead and injured in such an event.

Watch: Bus crash victim's father's biggest hope is to change attitudes. Story continues below.

Sixteen people were killed and 13 others were injured in last April's collision.

A semi-truck barrelled through a stop sign at a rural intersection and was struck by the Broncos hockey bus.

The report lists the deaths as accidental and the chief coroner is not calling for an public inquest.

In December, the Saskatchewan government announced it will make training mandatory for semi-truck drivers starting in March. Drivers seeking a Class 1 commercial licence will have to undergo at least 121 1/2 hours of training.

Transport Canada announced in June that the department will require all newly built highway buses to have seatbelts by September 2020. Some charter bus companies say many new vehicles already have seatbelts, although there is no way to ensure passengers are wearing them