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Craig and Marc Kielburger

Co-founders, WE Charity

Humanitarians, activists and social entrepreneurs, brothers Craig and Marc Kielburger are co-founders of WE, an organization that makes doing good, doable.

WE works with developing communities in nine countries, and empowers youth in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom by connecting them with global issues and social causes. WE Day is the annual celebration of these young change-makers, held in more than 15 cities worldwide.

Marc and Craig are syndicated columnists and authors of more than 10 books, including The World Needs Your Kid, and the New York Times bestseller Me to We. Their work has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show as well as on CNN, BBC, 60 Minutes and The Today Show, and in People, Time and The Economist.

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The Next 10 Years Will Offer Limitless Options to Change the World for the Better

When we set out in 1995 to end child labour, we stood on a straight road with just two directions to choose from: donate to a charity, or start one. It's incredible how much has changed in the world of "doing good" since then. It's been thrilling to see the growth of social enterprise and corporate citizenship over the last 10 years. Even more thrilling is what these changes will mean for the average consumer over the next decade.
05/08/2015 08:31 EDT
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What 20 Years Has Taught Us: Empowering People to Be Changemakers

When we help, the patient become the doctor, the student become the teacher, the troubled youth become the counsellor -- when the helped becomes the helper -- the impact multiplies by orders of magnitude. It's the difference between giving youth a seedling to plant, and empowering them to lead their community in growing forest.
05/05/2015 05:30 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

#BringBackOurGirls and the Limits of Clicktivism

One year later, what has #BringBackOurGirls accomplished? It didn't bring the girls home. Second-hand reports suggest that 57 of the girls escaped their captors, but the rest are still out there, likely sold off as child brides (or sex slaves). Recently, a UN official said there's evidence they may be dead. It's a sad illustration of the limitations of "clicktivism" -- the use of online media to advance causes. There must be a plan to engage supporters once they've clicked, and keep them engaged, even after the hashtag stops trending.
04/17/2015 12:51 EDT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fighting Climate Change Is Fighting for Human Rights

Last week, the world observed Earth Hour. Across Canada people flipped off the lights in a symbolic gesture to support action against climate change. But some influential voices like Watt-Cloutier and Mary Robinson -- former prime minister of Ireland and United Nations High Commissioner -- suggest we're looking at climate change the wrong way. Climate change is not only an environmental issue, they say. It's also a human rights issue.
04/10/2015 09:05 EDT
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The Masculinity Crisis Is Important to Explore

Boys and young men often erect a front of dominance, control, even aggression, because they believe that is what is expected of them. That toxic culture has tragic consequences. In Canada, the male suicide rate is three times that of women. Boys are three to five times more likely to drop out of high school than girls.
03/12/2015 12:57 EDT
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Reflecting on Nunavut's First 15 Years

Earlier this month, Inuit leaders and others gathered in Ottawa to look back at the past 15 years and, more importantly, discuss Nunavut's future. With pressure growing to resolve many outstanding aboriginal treaty issues across Canada, it's worth looking at the Nunavut experience.
02/26/2015 12:19 EST
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Human Trafficking Is Part of the Story of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women

Aboriginal women and girls are at higher risk of becoming victims of human trafficking in Canada than non-aboriginals, according to Canada's National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking. This selling and abusing of people -- a modern-day form of slavery -- is one of the pieces that make up the complex puzzle of Canada's more than 1,100 missing and murdered aboriginal women. And another reason we must take action.
02/19/2015 12:24 EST
ASSOCIATED PRESS

An Invitation to Understand This Remote First Nations Community

For the youth of the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation community, the nearest high school is hundreds of kilometres away by plane. If you break a bone, it's another flight for treatment. But despite the challenges they face, none of the residents of this remote fly-in northern Ontario community would abandon their homes and land.
02/13/2015 09:30 EST
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The One Issue Chief Bellegarde Wants To Fix Right Now

Language is highly personal issue for this leader. He told us he didn't learn his own Cree tongue until university and that profoundly impacted his sense of identity. Knowing their own language, he argues, is essential for First Nations children because "studies have shown that when a child is fluent in their indigenous language, they're more successful in school and life."
02/06/2015 08:42 EST
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A Long, Burdensome Road for Syrian Refugees and Their Canadian Sponsors

Militias set fire to homes with families still inside. From her safe refuge here in Canada, Dahlia heard the horrific reports and knew she had to get her family out of Syria. But to sponsor them as refugees in Canada would take an agonizing 18 months of bureaucracy and cost tens of thousands of dollars. Dahlia's ordeal raises the question, Are the demands of sponsorship too great for Canadians to bear?
01/29/2015 05:16 EST
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Why 2014 Wasn't Exactly a Year Worth Tweeting About

On balance, however, this was not a good year for world peace. Russian aggression in Crimea and the Ukraine, and the West's response, pushed the world closer to a new Cold War. Revelations about the CIA's use of torture were enough to shake anyone's faith in the goodness of humanity. Meanwhile, the Middle East spiralled downward with greater violence in Gaza, Syria and Iraq. At home we are still not on track to meet our emissions targets. And the strongest praise environmentalists could muster for the climate change deal reached in Lima, Peru, last week was to wince and say it is "better than nothing."
12/27/2014 01:21 EST
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Why Do So Many Still Fear the "F" Word

There are a growing number of people who spurn the words "feminism" and "feminist" even though they support women's rights and equality. It seems there's widespread misunderstanding about what these terms mean. And the message that sends to youth about the ideals of gender equality concerns us deeply
12/12/2014 08:51 EST