profile image

Craig and Marc Kielburger

Co-founders, WE Charity

Humanitarians, activists and social entrepreneurs, brothers Craig and Marc Kielburger are co-founders of WE, an organization that makes doing good, doable.

WE works with developing communities in nine countries, and empowers youth in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom by connecting them with global issues and social causes. WE Day is the annual celebration of these young change-makers, held in more than 15 cities worldwide.

Marc and Craig are syndicated columnists and authors of more than 10 books, including The World Needs Your Kid, and the New York Times bestseller Me to We. Their work has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show as well as on CNN, BBC, 60 Minutes and The Today Show, and in People, Time and The Economist.

Why 2014 Wasn't Exactly a Year Worth Tweeting DIBYANGSHU SARKAR via Getty Images

Why 2014 Wasn't Exactly a Year Worth Tweeting About

On balance, however, this was not a good year for world peace. Russian aggression in Crimea and the Ukraine, and the West's response, pushed the world closer to a new Cold War. Revelations about the CIA's use of torture were enough to shake anyone's faith in the goodness of humanity. Meanwhile, the Middle East spiralled downward with greater violence in Gaza, Syria and Iraq. At home we are still not on track to meet our emissions targets. And the strongest praise environmentalists could muster for the climate change deal reached in Lima, Peru, last week was to wince and say it is "better than nothing."
12/27/2014 01:21 EST
Why Do So Many Still Fear the Valerie Loiseleux via Getty Images

Why Do So Many Still Fear the "F" Word

There are a growing number of people who spurn the words "feminism" and "feminist" even though they support women's rights and equality. It seems there's widespread misunderstanding about what these terms mean. And the message that sends to youth about the ideals of gender equality concerns us deeply
12/12/2014 08:51 EST
Put a Face to the Numbers Struggling With

Put a Face to the Numbers Struggling With HIV/AIDS

We're winning the fight against HIV/AIDS, but we can't be complacent. There's still work to be done. For instance, more than 21 million people don't have access to the treatments that can lengthen and improve their lives--largely because an estimated 19 million are unaware they have HIV at all.
12/01/2014 01:15 EST
From Tragedy to Responsibility: The Lessons of

From Tragedy to Responsibility: The Lessons of Bhopal

For the people of Bhopal, the disaster never ended. They still suffer from water contamination, respiratory illnesses, and higher rates of infant mortality and birth defects. They've waged one court fight after another for more compensation. Thirty years ago the world failed to protect Bhopal. We owe it to them, and all developing communities, to enshrine corporate responsibility in national and international law.
11/27/2014 06:18 EST
How To Channel Your Inner Superhero - No Spandex VolNa69 via Getty Images

How To Channel Your Inner Superhero - No Spandex Required

One day, one Grade 9 boy was mercilessly teased for wearing a pink shirt -- the next day, encouraged by seniors Price and Shepherd on social media, 800 schoolmates showed up in a sea of pink to express their solidarity. Today, Pink Shirt Days are held in schools across 13 countries by students who want to show they won't tolerate bullying.
11/23/2014 11:24 EST
The Sisyphean Plight of Women from Elections to Getty

The Sisyphean Plight of Women from Elections to Ghomeshi

In ancient Greek mythology, King Sisyphus was cursed for an eternity to heave a massive boulder up a steep hill, only to watch the rock roll back down again and again when he nears the top. Compared to the struggles of women everywhere for equality and respect, you could say Sisyphus had it soft. At the current rate of progress it will take at least 81 years for women globally to achieve global equality in key areas, according to a new report from the World Economic Forum (WEF). Meanwhile, from the studios of the CBC to the streets of New York, recent stories of harassment and violence against women abound.
11/14/2014 08:58 EST
How Canadian Bosses Can Boost Our Mental Natalie Young via Getty Images

How Canadian Bosses Can Boost Our Mental Health

Every week, more than a half-million Canadians miss work because of mental health problems, costing the Canadian economy over $50 billion a year. So there's good reason why the Economic Club of Canada teamed up with business leaders and mental health organizations to launch the Wellth Management Mental Health at Work Challenge this fall in cities across the country.
11/10/2014 05:33 EST
How These Canadians Helped Diabetes in roobcio via Getty Images

How These Canadians Helped Diabetes in India

With our health care system, diabetes is more easily managed in Canada. But in a developing community, most can't afford a computerized glucometer. So diabetes goes largely untreated, leading to critical complications like blindness, heart disease and kidney failure. Diabetes claims 3.4 million lives every year.
11/06/2014 12:48 EST
From Ayr to Here -- Studying the Scottish Experiment in Youth ASSOCIATED PRESS

From Ayr to Here -- Studying the Scottish Experiment in Youth Voting

The entire school in Ayr, Scotland, vibrated with anticipation. The lunchroom sounded more like a debate hall than a cafeteria. Kirsty McCahill watched the clock tick down to the closing bell. She rushed home, then to the nearby community centre to do what no Scottish 16-year-old had ever done before that day: vote on the future of her country.
10/30/2014 05:55 EDT
How Young Canadians Become YouTube

How Young Canadians Become Jihadists

So many young Canadians are looking to make their mark on the world. Some pick up a shovel to build a school or a ladle in soup kitchens to serve the homeless. A small number choose a different way, traveling to Syria to pick up an AK-47. Where does the road diverge between the youth who choose the path of helping and those on the path of harm? And for those on the road toward extremism, are there points along their journey where they might be set on a positive path?
10/17/2014 12:24 EDT
After Ebola, Let's Not Forget Sierra AP

After Ebola, Let's Not Forget Sierra Leone

Like a decade ago, the goal is to end the Ebola crisis and allow a nation to begin its recovery. The next step will be to re-open schools shuttered by chaos and fear, allowing the next generation of health practitioners to be educated. But success will only be achieved -- and the next crisis averted before it begins -- if we all follow the example of those Canadian children who refused to ship out of Sierra Leone until the job was done.
10/09/2014 05:37 EDT
Annoyed at Your Homework? A Girl in Kenya Will Change Your NetHope Academy

Annoyed at Your Homework? A Girl in Kenya Will Change Your Mind

When the students at Kisaruni All-Girls Secondary School in rural Kenya had the opportunity to set their school hours, they pushed the limits. The girls begin their studies each morning at 4:45 a.m. and end at 10 p.m., with classroom instruction from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The grumbling resentment toward schoolwork that typifies the North American high-school experience seemed, well, positively lame, compared to the Kenyan girls' fierce dedication to learning.
09/29/2014 12:41 EDT
Attawapiskat Finally Has a Real School CP

Attawapiskat Finally Has a Real School Again

In the dead of winter, minus 40 degree winds whistled through gaps around doors and windows of the decrepit portables that made up the entirety of their school. Until this month, that was life in elementary school in Attawapiskat. After a 14-year wait, children in the remote northern Ontario First Nations community have a real school again.
09/25/2014 05:37 EDT
Racism Is Canada's Problem Too - Let's Talk About White Packert via Getty Images

Racism Is Canada's Problem Too - Let's Talk About it

Irony -- when Canada's Minister of State for Multiculturalism is the victim of a racial slur. Minister Tim Uppal and his family walked into an Edmonton tennis club this past week and overheard a woman express disgust that the Sikh-Canadian family was allowed membership. She went on to suggest that Uppal was probably unemployed. It was an ugly reminder that Canada may be the land of multiculturalism, but we are not immune to racism.
09/18/2014 05:40 EDT
How the U.N. Exists in Thunder

How the U.N. Exists in Thunder Bay

No more hockey. No more swimming lessons. For 15,000 Thunder Bay families living in poverty, the proposed funding cuts in 2005 meant the end of the only affordable sports and recreation programs available to their children. The council debate was rancorous. The motion looked ready to pass. Then one councillor rose to remind his colleagues of their promise to the city's young: the Children's Charter.
09/11/2014 12:49 EDT
How Adult Literacy Is Transforming a luoman via Getty Images

How Adult Literacy Is Transforming a Village

September 8 is International Literacy Day, marked with events in schools and communities around the world, and highlighted by a United Nations celebration and conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Despite the promising gains of the UN's worldwide "Literacy as Freedom" decade that ended in 2012, more than 770 million people over the age of 15 cannot read or write.
09/07/2014 09:55 EDT