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Grant Mitchell

Senator

Senator Grant Mitchell has had careers in the public service, business and politics in Alberta. He was appointed to the Senate in 2005 and sits as a Liberal. He received a Master of Arts in Political Studies from Queen’s University in 1976 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Political Science from the University of Alberta in 1973. He obtained his Chartered Financial Analyst designation in 1983. From 1994 to 1998 Senator Mitchell was leader of Alberta’s official opposition and leader of the Alberta Liberal Party. Prior to this, he was the official opposition’s House Leader from 1993 to 1994. He was a member of the Alberta Legislative Assembly for the riding of Edmonton McClung, serving from 1986 to 1998. In 1988 and 1989, Senator Mitchell taught graduate level courses in the field of business-government relations as a sessional lecturer in the Faculty of Management, University of Calgary, and the Faculty of Business, University of Alberta. He has had experience in business as an executive with Principal Group Ltd. from 1979 to 1986 and as an investment advisor with CIBC Wood Gundy from 1998-2008. From 1976 to 1979, he worked in the Government of Alberta, first as a Budget Analyst in the Treasury Department and then as Senior Intergovernmental Affairs Officer in the Department of Federal and Intergovernmental Affairs. Senator Mitchell also served on the boards of the Edmonton ITU World Cup Triathlon and on the board of the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Senator Mitchell is currently the Deputy Chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural resources, and a member of the Senate Standing Committee on National Security and Defence.
Climate Change Is A Human Rights

Climate Change Is A Human Rights Issue

It has become clear that climate change will disproportionately impact the world's most vulnerable because they are heavily dependent on resources that will be affected by climatic change. Whether by virtue of socio-economic status, conflict, gender or geography, certain groups are more liable than others to be negatively impacted by climate change, which directly implicates the question of human rights. How will this differentially influence people's lives, living conditions and livelihoods, and who are the most vulnerable?
11/26/2015 05:22 EST
How RCMP Harassment Ruined One Woman's

How RCMP Harassment Ruined One Woman's Life

We continue to hear from victims of harassment in the RCMP. They tell us that the current complaints system is broken; and that there is little accountability for breaches of policy. The stories we hear are powerful reminders of a broken system. This is Deanna's story, it is one of many: "In January 2004, while on duty, I suffered a hearing loss as a result of several shotgun blasts. My operational career ended abruptly once it was determined that my hearing loss was so significant that I could no longer perform my operational duties. When I was deemed no longer 'useful' was when the harassment began by my detachment commander."
10/17/2013 05:19 EDT
Give Harassed RCMP Officers Real Change, Not Lip

Give Harassed RCMP Officers Real Change, Not Lip Service

After a string of reports over 10 years, government legislation Bill C-42, and more recently a report by the Senate Defence Committee providing 14 recommendations for change, our offices continue to receive emails from RCMP staff. The emails provide a grim look into the past, and offer little hope for the future. They are from people at the end of their ropes. Reassurances from Ottawa, they tell us, have little impact on their daily lives and they are looking for real change. Those who have publicly spoken out have been chastised for doing so, but most of victims still love the organization and want to lend a hand fixing it. They are asking us: "what's actually changed?" and more importantly, "what's next?"
09/04/2013 05:54 EDT