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Livio Di Matteo

Professeur d'économie à l'Université Lakehead

Livio Di Matteo est expert-conseil à EvidenceNetwork.ca et professeur d’économie à l’Université Lakehead.
Looking At The Changing World Of The Canada Health

Looking At The Changing World Of The Canada Health Transfer

The Harper era saw the move to a full per capita funding formula without a tax-point equalizing adjustment in 2014-15 -- basically a top-down policy change. Prime Minister Harper did continue with the 6 per cent annual escalator, which was part of the original 2004 Health Accord. But he also unilaterally decided to end the escalator in 2017-18 and replace it with increases tied to the growth rate of GDP and subject to a floor of 3 per cent.
06/09/2017 06:19 EDT
Does Having More Doctors And Health Specialists Mean Better

Does Having More Doctors And Health Specialists Mean Better Care?

While governments such as Ontario have been focusing on reducing or holding physician fees steady as a cost control measure, health-care spending is also affected by the overall number of physicians we have and the number of services each provides to their patients.
09/06/2016 12:01 EDT
There's No Good Reason Canada Shouldn't Have a National Drug

There's No Good Reason Canada Shouldn't Have a National Drug Plan

A new study in the <em>Canadian Medical Association Journal</em> with health economist Steve Morgan as lead author argues a national universal care drug program would not result in substantial tax increases. It seems the time is ripe to finally complete our universal system of public healthcare coverage by adding a national public drug plan. If anything, these cautions should serve as guideposts to make sure a new national drug plan is not only effective but also designed in a fiscally sustainable manner.
04/14/2015 05:25 EDT
Provinces Have Reined in Healthcare Costs -- But Not for

Provinces Have Reined in Healthcare Costs -- But Not for Long

In the wake of new health expenditure data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), the evidence continues to mount that Canadian public health expenditure growth is moderating. Moreover, adjusting for inflation and population growth, per capita provincial and territorial government health expenditures have actually declined since their peak in 2010.
11/13/2014 01:08 EST
The Government Is Pulling Away From Health Care

The Government Is Pulling Away From Health Care Spending

Expenditures on public health care in Canada appear to be slowing, raising the possibility that the health care cost curve is finally being bent and the system transformed. What does this mean? The economy will eventually recover and relax provincial health expenditure constraints, but federal health transfer growth will be reduced starting in 2017.
04/08/2014 12:32 EDT