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Michael Wolfson

Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada, Université d'Ottawa

Agissant comme expert-conseil à EvidenceNetwork.ca, Michael Wolfson est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en systèmes de modélisation sur la santé de la population, de l’Université d’Ottawa. Anciennement statisticien en chef adjoint à Statistique Canada, il détient un doctorat en économie de l’Université de Cambridge.
Canada Cannot Afford To Be Complacent About Growing

Canada Cannot Afford To Be Complacent About Growing Inequality

For many Canadians, the outcome of the United States election has been a shock. Trump's campaign, as inarticulate and venal as it was, tapped into important and deeply rooted realities, realities that may contain lessons for Canada too. Does Canada need to worry about the same festering malaise that has become so dramatically evident in the U.S.?
11/29/2016 10:01 EST
People Need Less Money To Live As They Get Older? (Not

People Need Less Money To Live As They Get Older? (Not Quite)

Recently the C.D. Howe Institute released a short study just in time for the finance ministers' meeting - rolling out the tired, old argument that as people age, they do not need as much money to live as when they were younger. If only retirement were so easy.
06/27/2016 05:34 EDT
Asking if Canadians Spend Too Much on Taxes Misses the

Asking if Canadians Spend Too Much on Taxes Misses the Point

"There are lies, damned lies and statistics" is the well-worn phrase, but nothing better sums up the recent Fraser Institute scare mongering about taxes being the single largest budget item of Canadian households -- as catchy as the headlines may be, it is alarmist spin. Such biased economic exercises raise a fundamental question: Just what indicators should we be using to keep score on Canada's economic performance?
10/08/2015 08:16 EDT
In Canada,

In Canada, "Rags to Riches" Is a Myth

The Fraser Institute's recent study on income mobility claims it is turning conventional wisdom on its head. In a nutshell, they say income inequality in Canada is not a problem because more people have incomes that have been going up than down, particularly among the poorest earners. This reasoning, if it were conceptually and empirically correct, would certainly provide an important caution to the Occupy Wall Street concerns about the dramatic growth in incomes of the top one per cent. Unfortunately, its results are misleading.
12/04/2012 12:19 EST