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Tara K. Reed

Author of interactive novels, disability rights advocate.

Tara K. Reed is the Toronto-born author of interactive novels Love Him Not and Bewitched, Bothered and Beheaded. She uses her experience battling multiple debilitating illnesses to advocate for disability rights. www.Doorflower.com.
Stop Giving Pretty White Murderers A

Stop Giving Pretty White Murderers A Pass

Since learning Karla Homolka has been volunteering at an elementary school in Montreal, I've found myself shellshocked by the number of people willing to defend her technical, legal right to privacy. That's downright Canadian of you, but could we stop letting pretty white women in North America literally and figuratively get away with murder?
06/05/2017 09:58 EDT
What Passes For Feminism These Days Needs To Do

What Passes For Feminism These Days Needs To Do Better

Feminism: you in danger, girl. Blogger Tara K. Reed explains why she struggles with the term feminist as a woman with a disability and why she would like to see a change in how the term is used among millennials and in pop culture.
03/08/2017 11:15 EST
Sports Fans Mad At Meryl Streep Only Prove Her

Sports Fans Mad At Meryl Streep Only Prove Her Point

If, after hearing her speech, you dedicated more of your able body and mind to railing against those thirty words than you did to meaningfully advocating for the safety of particularly vulnerable people, your lack of empathy only highlights how right she was to contrast the cultural impact of "The Arts" and that of televised sports.
01/12/2017 03:04 EST
Trump Win Proves You Can't Be 'Your Own Kind' Of

Trump Win Proves You Can't Be 'Your Own Kind' Of Feminist

After the U.S. election, I wanted to call myself a feminist. Especially as friends wept about the uncertain (and certain) future of a Trump America. Still, I can't. Because feminism is hiding too many racists and bigots. People who hear "Be your own kind of feminist" and place emphasis on "your own kind."
11/14/2016 12:59 EST
The Problem With Toronto's Accessibility

The Problem With Toronto's Accessibility Permits

As a disabled person, navigating Toronto is stressful and dangerous -- not just because of potholes and construction-brutalized sidewalks, but because of transit. And people. Especially people operating or riding transit. This is largely due to the absence of inclusion of pedestrians in the Ministry of Transportation's Accessibility Permit Program, currently only issued for drivers/passengers of cars, which leaves the rest of us vulnerable to harassment and injury.
08/11/2016 12:58 EDT