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B.C. Government Could Learn A Few Things From Neighbour Alberta

There's no shortage of problems for a public consultation on electoral issues to consider.
B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan walks to speak to reporters while bringing voters to a polling station to vote in the provincial election, in Coqutilam, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.
B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan walks to speak to reporters while bringing voters to a polling station to vote in the provincial election, in Coqutilam, B.C., on Tuesday May 9, 2017.
A young girl walks in front of British Columbia's New Democratic Party leader John Horgan while he addresses supporters during a campaign stop at a hotel in Surrey, B.C., May 8, 2017.
A young girl walks in front of British Columbia's New Democratic Party leader John Horgan while he addresses supporters during a campaign stop at a hotel in Surrey, B.C., May 8, 2017.
Alberta Premier Rachel Notley takes part in the First Ministers meeting in Ottawa, Ont., Dec. 9, 2016.
Alberta Premier Rachel Notley takes part in the First Ministers meeting in Ottawa, Ont., Dec. 9, 2016.

The province's Wild West political culture has left a distorted reality of donations and party spending, especially when compared to the rest of Canada.

A voter arrives at a polling station on a bike to cast their ballot in the provincial election in the riding of Vancouver-Fraserview, in Vancouver, B.C., on  May 9, 2017.
A voter arrives at a polling station on a bike to cast their ballot in the provincial election in the riding of Vancouver-Fraserview, in Vancouver, B.C., on May 9, 2017.

After the count, it's important for the public to feel confident that whichever party won, did so fair and square.

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