Alicia Keys' Son, Egypt Dean, Composes Sweet Tune For Juneteenth

"I wrote this for us," said Egypt, before proving he's definitely inherited his mom's talent.

A talent for tickling the ivories runs strong in Alicia Keys’ family, and the proof is in the sweet song her son Egypt Dean put out in celebration of Juneteenth.

“Happy Juneteenth, blessings — I wrote this for us,” said Dean, the nine-year-old son of Keys and Swizz Beatz. The video was posted on Keys’ Instagram along with a caption commemorating Juneteenth, which celebrates the emancipation Black people enslaved in the United States. Watch the video below:

“Happy Juneteeth, for the people,” sings Dean, with a voice that reminds of his mother’s. “Celebrate, celebrate today.” He even takes a moment for a little piano break, riffing off Maroon 5′s ‘Memories’ (which itself riffs off Johann Pachelbel’s famous Canon in D) spotlighting his natural, effortless talent.

“We still have so much more to fight for,” said Keys’ in the caption of Dean’s sweet, sombre tune. Juneteenth, which is a combination of June 19, has gained renewed attention this year with ongoing protests and demonstrations in the U.S. against anti-Black racism. The day marks the moment on June 19, 1865, when Union troops finally arrived to Texas, and on behalf of the government, declared that slaves were free.

The holiday is celebrated across the U.S. to varying degrees given that it’s only a paid national holiday in some states, but many have been pushing for that to change.

“Keep knowing our greatness and our collective power,” added Keys. She also hosted a piano battle with fellow artist John Legend in celebration of Juneteenth.

Superstar musician Beyoncé also dropped a brand-new song to mark the day. She is donating all proceeds from the song to her Black Business Impact Fund, which will support small Black-owned businesses in need.

This year’s Juneteenth celebrations in the U.S. saw continued demonstrations, with protesters calling for an end to racism and police brutality, especially against Black people. Demonstrations have been taking place consistently across the country long before Juneteenth, after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May, and many who came before and after him. The protests have gone beyond the U.S., with many others across Canada, Europe and other countries also banding together for peaceful demonstrations against anti-Black racism.

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