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Ian Holm, 'Lord Of The Rings' Star, Dead At 88

The British actor also starred in "The Hobbit" and "Chariots Of Fire."

Sir Ian Holm, star of “The Lord Of The Rings” films, has died at the age of 88.

The British actor was well known for playing Bilbo Baggins in “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” trilogies.

His agent has confirmed he “died peacefully” in hospital on Friday morning.

Alex Irwin, from Markham, Froggatt & Irwin, said his illness was “Parkinson’s related.

In a statement, he added: “[Ian] was a genius of stage and screen, winning multiple awards and loved by directors, audiences and his colleagues alike.

“His sparkling wit always accompanied a mischievous twinkle in his eye.

“Charming, kind and ferociously talented, we will miss him hugely.”

British actor Ian Holm is seen here in 2004. He was married four times and had five children.
British actor Ian Holm is seen here in 2004. He was married four times and had five children.

Holm was born on Sept. 12, 1931, in Goodmayes, U.K.

Inspired by seeing “Les Miserables” as a boy, he secured a place at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in 1949 before joining the Royal Shakespeare Company.

His role as Sam Mussabini in “Chariots Of Fire” earned him a special award at the Cannes Film Festival, a BAFTA award and an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor.

He also found a new audience in the 1990s in the role of Pod in the TV adaptation of “The Borrowers.”

The actor’s other screen credits included “The Fifth Element,” “Alien,” “The Sweet Hereafter,” “Time Bandits,” “The Emperor’s New Clothes” and “The Madness Of King George.”

He was also a celebrated theatre star, winning critical acclaim for his role as King Lear at the National Theatre in 1998, as well as a Tony Award for Best Featured Actor as Lenny in “The Homecoming.”

Holm was married four times, most recently to Sophie de Stempel, and had five children.

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