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1990s

Death was an omnipresent part of the alt-era, something we just took for granted at the time. It was something to live through at the time, but which we never questioned. It just was. And yet in hindsight so many deaths of so many young people seems unfathomable. And they didn't stop. And now Chris Cornell of suicide by hanging. It is an unimaginable tragedy for those who loved him personally -- his wife and his three children most of all -- and for all of those who loved the music he gave to the world and the operatic multi-octave howl he sang it to us with.
The legacy of the minivan is slowly on its way to the retirement rafters, alongside station wagons and three-wheeled cars. However, there are some -- like myself -- who recall a more innocent time; when the minivan was the ultimate spacious family vehicle.
Yes, it's been 25 years since I was an awkward teenager, screaming pop ballads out my car window on the way to my job at K-Mart. Like many people, the songs of my teen years hold a special place in my heart. So this week I'm taking the Delorean to 1990 and remembering what the Top Five Songs were on Billboard's Top 100 chart this week way back when.
When Our Lady Peace, Sloan and I Mother Earth hit Toronto's Echo Beach stage on Aug. 16 they'll be capping off another edition
For most Millennials, life thus far is divided into two distinct components: pre-9/11 and post-9/11. At the dividing line lies the first news report on the radio or the phone call in which the person on the other end said, "Turn on the TV." 9/11 forced us to grow up overnight, and growing up was not all that it's cracked up to be.
Pondering the genesis of hipsterdom, I often trace it back to Vice, and the importance they laid on the concept of "cool." I mean, Vice didn't invent it, they just presented a pre-existing sub-culture in a consumable format. And yeah: back then, I understood what Vice was because I was living it. But it's not 1997. After having a kid, I was admittedly nervous about having a full-colour, glossy magazine showing stylized images of syringes, used condoms and blood-soaked models lying around the house.
To celebrate the launch of HuffPost Canada's sparkling new music site, we're flying a lucky winner and their even luckier
Yeah, sure, so it’s the 21st Century and we love our iPhones, but sometimes (read: most of the time) we long for the good