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2015 Federal election

Burley says he plans to be a "resource for anyone who runs into difficulties."
After getting a driver's licence, I think most teens will tell you that the next milestone will be when they legally order a beer. Sadly they're missing what really is the most significant milestone. The federal government recognizes age 18 as the age at which one can vote in a federal election. Unfortunately, it seems that reaching vote eligibility is not nearly as meaningful as being allowed to order what's on tap.
If someone does not see much difference between NDP, Liberal, Bloc and Green policies they have not yet done their civic duty. Note the billions of public dollars that will be spent in dramatically different ways, the manner in which those promises will be funded and the starkly dissimilar approaches to democratic reform, climate change, civil liberties and foreign policy that these supposedly interchangeable parties advocate.
Citizens tend to blame our leaders for the kind of government we have. We ought to look in the mirror instead. Getting engaged every four to five years for six to eight weeks is not what it means to be a citizen.
I want the party and Prime Minister I vote for to show responsibility with how they spend our money; how they treat all classes of citizens and our environment; with how they paint a picture of the future they want to get to, and how I'm part of it.
As the federal election approaches, I've been stunned by how little party leaders have discussed one critical issue -- healthcare. While the common assumption is that our healthcare is free in Canada, this is a huge misconception.
For nine years, we have lived under a Harper government -- the only government most of my generation has ever known. During this time, our leaders have ignored youth unemployment, climate change, and student debt. I almost didn't vote in the last election because I figured it wouldn't make a difference. I feel entirely different this time around.
We shouldn't be judging a political leader on what he or she has been saying or doing a few weeks before an election. Assessment needs to be based on the prior years. In Mr. Trudeau's case, even putting aside the question of what we should expect to see in someone with such a privileged upbringing, a quick review of the past couple years is evidence enough.
As the federal election comes to its final stage, many eyes are on Ontario. Stephen Harper has been a regular visitor in ridings that the Conservatives currently hold, giving the impression that he is focusing on keeping versus increasing seats. Justin Trudeau on the other hand, is venturing into Conservative and NDP held ridings looking for new support. Winning seats in Ontario requires some fine balancing. While there is a desire to figure out what will appeal to voters across the province, it is also a bit of a mug's game and far more challenging than it looks.
What do seniors want? What will seniors get? Who gets the seniors' vote? Now that "everybody knows" that seniors are Canada's most committed voters -- peaking at 75 per cent turnout when the general turnout was 61 per cent in 2011, politicians of all stripes are pitching for their vote.