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50 cent

He was the first rapper to accept the cryptocurrency for his 2014 album, "Animal Ambition."
To err is human. Mistakes can be a valuable learning opportunity, and sometimes, the bigger the mistake, the bigger your lesson will be. Lucky for us, there are plenty of people out there who made huge personal finance mistakes in 2015, and we have the benefit of being able to sit back and learn from them.
December is a time for reflection, especially when it comes to your finances. The expensive holiday season -- think gifts, party outfits, and festive drinks -- means you're probably thinking about how to stick to a budget and keep costs down in 2014. It's also a time to reflect on mistakes, which is why I've rounded up the top personal finance fails of 2014. The purchases that made me cringe, the examples of internet over-sharing that made me wonder how someone's identity wasn't stolen sooner. All so you can avoid their mistakes in 2015.
There's no shortage of musicians who've accepted and had a little fun with the ALS ice bucket challenge. Lady Gaga's done
There have been a ton of great songs released so far in 2014, but if you've felt underwhelmed with a lack of exciting albums
50 Cent made his name as a badass rapper who survived being shot nine times and beefed with anyone and everyone he could
It's time Canadians are made aware of the tactics of intimidation employed by the BDS movement so that they understand that many celebrities who cancel events in Israel are not doing so for political reasons but rather out of concern for their lives -- personally and professionally.
These days it's not enough for musicians to simply make music. If you're Jay-Z you buy an ownership stake in a basketball
Power Rankings have been rating sports teams throughout their seasons for years based on statistical analysis, momentum and
In a speech recently delivered in Westminster, a UK MP, Chuka Umunna, shook conventional assessments of urban gangs by focusing on the "entrepreneurial zeal" that drives gang members and their illicit activities. In light of the recent Eaton Centre shootings, our Canadian politicians seem to have largely adopted the position that those involved in gangs are hopelessly and permanently corrupted.