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9/11 anniversary

ALSO ON HUFFPOST: Keefe's efforts were finally noticed by Fred Mahe, who is standing at the far left of the photo. Mahe was
In an unfortunate coincidence (or convenient bit of political timing) last night, on the eve of 9/11, President Obama addressed the world regarding the looming threat of ISIS and laid out America's plan to arm Syrian rebels and engage and destroy this group of extremists. It's too open and shut. ISIS is bad. Something must be done. We are going to do something about it. Not a word of how we got here. Not a moment to contemplate how the next step might create the next open and shut situation. Many regretful events led to the horror of September 11th and many more continue to happen as a consequence of it. To ignore this and go forward without learning a lesson from the price those people paid is a shame.
For most Millennials, life thus far is divided into two distinct components: pre-9/11 and post-9/11. At the dividing line lies the first news report on the radio or the phone call in which the person on the other end said, "Turn on the TV." 9/11 forced us to grow up overnight, and growing up was not all that it's cracked up to be.
Ten years later, my thoughts on 9/11 are the same as they were standing in the House of Commons on Sept. 18,2001: "My son put it best: 'We are all just earthlings and we have to learn how to share this rock.'"
Ten years on, there are likely just as many questions as there were when the twin towers fell. Our world doesn't feel safer
1. I remember waking up and going to work on Sept. 11, 2001. At the time I was working at a call centre for a growing company
Wasan Mohamad was in her Hamilton, Ont. apartment building elevator when she noticed a disturbing scrawl of yellow chalk
Like the moon landing and the assassination of U.S. president John F. Kennedy, the September 11, 2001, terror attacks on
Canadians mourn alongside Americans on this sad anniversary of 9/11. We were affected deeply on that day 10 years ago, nearly as much as the U.S. itself: not just by the Canadian lives we lost, but by the empathetic pain we feel when our closest kin suffers a tragedy. Whatever longstanding sibling rivalry Canadians have felt towards Americans vanished -- at that moment we became one family grieving death together. We also became key partners in what would be called the War on Terror: This week on HuffPost Canada, new contributor Jennifer Stoddart, Privacy Commissioner of Canada, offered important analysis of what this has meant to our privacy laws. We also welcomed aboard two distinguished contributors who offered their reactions to the news that the prime minister was considering re-introducing controversial anti-terrorism laws: former counter terror operative Mubin Shaikh and terrorist expert David Harris.
I remember that after the Sept. 11 attacks, a great pall fell over the otherwise gorgeous fall days. Everything during that season seemed at once excessively beautiful and excessively sad.