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Aboriginal People

Hate to be one of those folk that B.C. Housing Minister Rich Coleman believes has nothing better to do than get up and whine every day, but the B.C. government's affordable housing plan announced last week falls short. Sorry, someone had to say it.
The results show that Canadians still have a long way to go, said Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations.
The children of these women are almost forgotten. Our half-hearted national conversation on the ongoing racialized violence against stolen indigenous women barely acknowledges their existence. If there is even an estimate of the number of children affected, please let me know. And yet, the surviving children's loss is unimaginable. They lost mothers, sisters, aunts and cousins. You don't need to be a psychiatrist to understand that the grotesque violence aboriginal women suffer affects the mental integrity of the children they leave behind.
A B.C. developer is calling on the province to fix gaps in heritage conservation laws, after the City of Abbotsford recently
First Nations people are more likely to be admitted to hospital for a heart attack and at an earlier age than residents of
Chief Theresa Spence of Attawapiskat did not launch a hunger strike over a single piece of legislation. In short, this is what we have always been talking about. Whether the particular focus has been on housing, or education or the environment, or whatever else. What lies at the heart of all these issues is our relationship with Canada. And Canada? This relationship is abusive. We have been backed into a corner and we are literally fighting for our lives. We are literally dying, in so many preventable and unacceptable ways. I'm not being poetic or hyperbolic here and I don't just mean culturally. We are dying. I need you -- WE need you, to see the forest and not just the trees.
Empowering the present generation of aboriginal youth with a desire to learn and a desire to grow requires both the government and First Nations to accept responsibility for the initiative's success or failure.
When the Speech from the Throne promised 'concrete action' on Aboriginal issues, I thought the proof would be in pudding -- the 2011 budget. But no, the government had totally abdicated their responsibility for our Aboriginal peoples.