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achievement

Our sense of what is realistic or not might actually limit our own possibility. Consider running a four-minute mile. It was thought to be impossible until Roger Bannister broke the four-minute barrier in 1954. The record now stands at 3:43 and the mile has been run in under four minutes at least 4,500 times.
We all lack courage and perseverance; we stumble. Whether or not we can spell out procrastination, we are gold medalists in doing so. We know, however, there is nothing more de-motivating and damaging to our self-esteem than not being able to depend on ourselves.
During the past 30 years, more than 600 people from all walks of life have been invested into Order of Ontario. They are your neighbours. They represent the best of who we can be, and are united by their exceptional achievements and service to others. The Order of Ontario is how we recognize and celebrate those who have enriched our lives.
I have nothing against the word success or even it's traditional definition. It's just a word, after all. But let's call it what it is. It's a benchmark for performance and attainment -- a measuring stick. Tangible metrics are important and have their place, particularly in the business world. But if you're looking for personal fulfillment, it's not likely that traditional measures of success are going to get you there.
If you're a frenzied striver (and lord knows I have lots of experience in this department), you struggle and push and rage to get more, but before you take a moment to appreciate what you have, it's on to the next thing. Better. Higher. More stuff. More accomplishments. More accolades. Enough. You have enough. Notice it. Appreciate it.
We tend to be so hung up on rising to the top that we fail to realize that being overly competitive can actually push us down. True greatness comes to those who elevate others; who lift them up without regard to where it will place them in the hierarchy of the marketplace of life.
I am not saying that we should not strive to be the very best people and professionals we can be. This is not a call to "lean out." By all means, let's strive to be amazing, but let's also aspire to be more gentle with ourselves and with others.
Sometimes we get so caught up in getting ahead that we forget ourselves in the scramble. A firm believer in the pursuit of growth and development, I believe it's important to push yourself. It is equally important to pace yourself. You can do both. Here are some tips for hitting your stride:
2012-06-18-ShannonSkinner.jpg I recently had the pleasure of interviewing award-winning editor and celebrated columnist, Leah Eichler. Her weekly career takes a refreshing and insightful perspective on issues that women face in today's workplace.
2012-06-18-ShannonSkinner.jpg It was while working in brand marketing for packaged goods companies that Sandler, a single mother of four young children, felt there was a lack of the kind of market intelligence she desired, so she opened her own company...