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aging baby boomers

Canada is experiencing a demographic shift. Baby boomers, currently the largest generation, are rapidly reaching retirement age. By 2021, 17.8 per cent of the total Canadian population will be over 65 - that's nearly seven million people. By 2041, that number is expected to jump to 9.7 million, or 22.6 per cent.
The health workforce is the "elephant in the room" at health policy tables -- a large, pervasive issue that unfortunately often goes unaddressed. The health workforce is a pillar of the health system and so like the foundation of our homes, it can sometimes go unnoticed. But if we plan on reforming services (i.e., renovating our home), we are going to have to attend to whether the health workforce foundation can support the changes.
As the Canadian population continues to age, there is a need to revisit conventional thinking regarding the provision of health care services for seniors to ensure that the system is sustainable for all Canadians. There are a number of misperceptions in current thinking.
It doesn't matter if you're male or female, 25 or 75, by eating enough protein and engaging in regular weight training, you can slow aging, better your appearance, improve your health and prolong your life, as well as the quality of your later years.
If you're a boomer-aged manager who thinks they have what it takes to effectively work with a millennial workforce, think again. This test will show you whether you've actually got the skills, or if you have a lot of work ahead of you.
According to Statistics Canada, the "sandwich generation" now includes more than two million Canadians -- or 28 per cent of all caregivers in Canada -- with the majority being women between 35 and 44 years old. This number is only expected to rise as Canada's population ages and the older generation is no longer capable of caring for themselves. That leaves us with a generation stuck with caring for their late-leaving adult children and their ailing parents at the same time. How do they cope?
As our aging population increases, and most care homes are privately owned and outside of the budget of the average hardworking Canadian, the only other rational option is to move your Mom or Dad into your family home.
We're fortunate to live in an era where the average life expectancy is today over 80 years young. Unfortunately, the flip-side of Canadians living longer and generally healthier is that many older seniors experience multiple health problems -- a common yet under-recognized health state known as frailty.
One third of those caregivers say they are too stressed out to do it any longer.
What was traditionally considered a time of well-deserved rest and leisure now became "the power years," where people could finally realize their true potential. But clearly not everyone has bought into this concept. There is a new yearning for rest among today's older adults, although not quite in the same way their predecessors envisioned it.