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Aging in Place

Of the $220 billion spent on health care annually in Canada, 45 per cent is spent on those over 65 years old, although they only represent 15 per cent of the population. It's time we improved the quality and quantity of care delivered for frail Canadians - and improve the health system for everyone in the process.
It was a disappointing budget low on details for Alberta's fastest growing demographic - seniors. The percentage of seniors in Alberta is currently about 10 per cent and is estimated to double to 20 per cent by 2041. Even though Calgary is seen as a "young" city, our own demographic mix will mirror that of the province.
Those of us in the industry who are committed to providing quality seniors' housing and care -- many of whom also deal with the reality of aging parents -- believe that there is a long overdue conversation that Canadians should be having with their families.
One of the most dramatic consequences of age-related deterioration is loss of independence, and it is more feared by seniors than almost any other outcome. For many, even an untimely death seems preferable to becoming beholden to others, according to surveys. "Aging in place," as it is now widely called, is particularly popular among seniors who cherish the lifestyle they have become accustomed to and wish to maintain for as long as possible.