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al-assad

Replacing Bashar al-Assad in Syria is not sufficient. Shedding known problems for ones that are unknown is difficult. In Damascus, the ancient capital, or Aleppo, the nation's economic hub, exchanging a known set of difficulties (even terrible ones), for an unknown state of affairs is a fearful choice. But after the killing of four senior security officials in the very center of Damascus, the shelling of Damascus and the wholesale bombardment of Aleppo, perhaps the risk of doing nothing will finally outweigh the risk of the unknown.
Since Syrian crimes can be classified as "crimes against humanity" especially because they are state policy, why has Right to Protect not been invoked by the international community nor has reasonable action been undertaken by the Security Council and the ICC? The answer is simple: politics and personal interest. Without exception, it is believed that the atrocities committed by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his regime are far worse than those of Muammar Gaddafi. The UN estimates more than 3,500 people have been murdered; tens of thousands have vanished and are believed to be incarcerated.