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alaska

Looks like someone didn't know about the border closure.
They’ve officially taken the fun out of road trips and for good reason.
Here we are, mere days into a new year. On the first day of 2017 there were already 264 incidents of gun violence in the U.S. -- with at least 64 people killed and 146 injured. As of January 5 those numbers rose to 500 shootings, 113 deaths and 288 injuries. If, like me, you had hopes that, if Hillary Clinton became president, we might at last see some much-needed, long-overdue gun control in the U.S. we can certainly forget about it now. Not with Donald Trump as president.
In a $46.3-billion budget, $49.8 million is chump change, but the B.C. government's 84,346 credit card charges in 2015-16 do offer some insights into how the B.C. government spends on the run. While the number of charges is down from 102,418 in 2014-15, the dollar value is up from $45.1 million.
After three years of feverish construction, the long-awaited Canada-U.S. wall has finally been completed. At a dedication ceremony held at the heavily fortified Detroit-Windsor border crossing, President Donald Trump and the Canadian prime minister jointly conducted a ribbon cutting.
The global economic recovery is stumbling badly. Even in the U.S., weakening corporate earnings are deflating stock prices. We can all see that, too. Increasingly, the "smart money" is betting on gold. That is because gold bullion has traditionally been prized as a hedge against both economic malaise and political crises.
The salmon farming industry has long been banned in Alaska, where it's believed to be a threat to the state's healthy wild salmon populations. But that's not the case in Canada, where Norwegian-owned aquaculture multinationals have done a terrific job of winning over the federal government.
Alaskans emphasize they are not against resource extraction, provided there are adequate environmental and financial safeguards, but believe Canada's record -- most recently illustrated by the Mount Polley mine tailings dam collapse -- shows that B.C.'s regulations are not strong enough to protect downstream communities.
Every year my spirit alternatively soars and then sinks as one to three billion birds migrate to Canada's boreal region to breed and then depart with two billion young for their southern wintering grounds. Each year I wonder, who will survive the journey south and who will come back next spring?
An ugly thread of misspent taxpayer dollars, environmental destruction and conflict-of-interest -- backed by a government beholden to the mining industry -- runs along the recently completed Northwest Transmission Line, charges acclaimed explorer and scholar Wade Davis.