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alberta budget 2013

The Alberta government is facing a deficit in the area of $4 billion. By now we have all heard the discussions regarding the recommended courses of action that the government should take to make sure that Alberta's finances get back into the black; reform Alberta's taxation system (although the budget saw no such reforms), cut government spending, and diversify Alberta's energy export markets.
The amount the province dishes out for health care is going up, and it plans to borrow money for health infrastructure, but
Alberta educators were left dismayed by Thursday's budget, after the government pulled out of previous promises to increase
If reaction in social media was any indication of how the 2013 Alberta budget was received on Thursday, the numbers in the
Opposition parties had been loud and constant about how big a failure the 2013 Alberta budget was going to be and it seems
EDMONTON -- The 2013 Alberta budget will see no increase in overall day-to-day spending, but revenue shortfall means the
In a move marking the passing of Canadian hero Stompin' Tom Connors, Alberta Liberals found a clever way to herald what promises
It's budget day in Alberta, and Premier Alison Redford says that while lean times are ahead, there won't be any tax hikes
With all the gloom-and-doom swirling around Edmonton this week, an outside observer might conclude a state funeral was in the works instead of an annual budget presentation. Yet while Premier Redford undeniably has tough decisions to make, there are promising signals that she is looking beyond bubbles and examining a range of more enduring solutions to the province's challenges.
There might be a thousand reasons why people hate sales taxes. Here are three: First, they're visible; second, in Alberta, where no provincial sales tax exists, there is justifiable pride that people have escaped at least one tax applied elsewhere in Canada; third, many Albertans rightly fear that if a government introduced a new tax, it would be just another way to separate taxpayers from their money and to spend more and inefficiently so.