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alberta climate change

Transalta is one of Alberta's largest electricity generation companies and they own and operate a lot of Alberta's thermal coal generation assets. They recently held their annual general meeting and the news and quotes coming out of it are enough to give you pause. So let's look into this.
While coal phaseout and the clean energy transition is the right decision for Alberta, towns like Hanna, Forestburg, Wabamun, and more are going to be very affected by the change in the short and medium term. We need a high quality employment and investment strategy that supports workers, families and communities affected by the clean energy transition.
“We’ve consistently found opposition to new taxes in Alberta."
Rachel Notley's challenge has been to reassure the fiercely skeptical Alberta business elites that were horrified to wake up last May to discover the NDP had risen to power. With the economy already hammered by plummeting oil prices, they feared that the New Democrats would inflict further damage through a climate change plan that would drive up costs and cripple the oil sands. But business leaders in the Alberta can read the financial press as well as the rest of us and now seem to be buying Rachel Notley's view that they better try to be part of the solution.
Emissions targets were the kind of policy that we needed in the tar sands a decade ago, but today the measure of climate leadership isn't a target for what you won't put in the air -- it's legislation that listen to the science and keeps fossil fuels in the ground.
What does success look like for Alberta within ten years?
Alberta unveils newly appointed five-person panel, including reps with links to two major Canadian energy companies.
Large businesses will be forced to reduce the intensity of their CO2 emissions by 20 per cent by 2017.
Whether we like it or not, the world is using Alberta's development of our oilsands as a proxy in the fight against climate change, in large part because our transparent regulatory reporting system requires Alberta producers to report the impacts of their operations.
Canada has the third largest proven oil reserves in the world, but the province of Alberta is planning to cut education and health care spending this year, and Canada's national debt stands at a whopping CDN$600 billion. How can that be? With so many people calling our massive tar sands reserves the "Saudi Arabia of the North," how can we be so cash-strapped?