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alberta oil sands

McKibben and 350.org should spend more time working on domestic politics rather than blaming Canada for selling into the U.S. market and helping satisfy American energy demand. More simply, instead of attacking our elected officials, he could work at reducing U.S. demand.
When TransCanada first announced its 4400km Energy East pipeline project from Alberta to Saint John, the spin was all about nation-building. This spin is dependent on the idea that Energy East will see crude produced in the Prairies replace so-called foreign imports to Atlantic Canada.
The high levels of consumer debt in Alberta were always kept in check by the ability to pay it back, but now it seems that the oil collapse has rumbled its way through the Wild Rose County and is putting the squeeze on Albertans and their bills.
As momentous an occasion as it is when an oil jurisdiction actually puts limits on growth, 100 million tonnes of carbon a year at a time when science is demanding bold reductions is still far too much. While historic, the government's cap needs to be viewed as a ceiling rather then a floor.
OPEC took a swing at U.S. shale and knocked down Canada. Threatened by surging production from North America, the Organization
Keystone was a fight that no one thought we could win. When the pipeline was first proposed, every energy analyst, every journalist and every politician either had never heard of it or thought the same thing -- the pipeline was a virtual certainty and its approval was imminent.
Both Trudeau and his new ministers have their work cut out from them when it comes to really getting Canada back on course on climate. That's why today, I'm outside of Trudeau's home with dozens of other people kicking off what could be largest act of civil disobedience on climate change in Canada's history.
Saudi Arabia projected to run massive deficits Storage getting close to capacity, Goldman Sachs warns Canadian oil producers
Perhaps the biggest change that mine developers will see with the new government is the Liberals' determination to reverse the Conservatives' streamlining of environmental approvals by skipping the federal approval process, if the project had already met environmental approvals at the provincial level.
Extreme weather conditions, storms, flooding, droughts and ice melting are the new reality in too many parts of the world. People are losing their livelihood, their homes, their jobs -- and even their lives. While scientists and faith leaders call for urgent action, our political leaders have failed to take necessary actions.