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alberta progressive conservatives

Painting Trudeau's Liberals as Alberta's boogeyman ignores our province's turbulent relationship with the previous CPC federal government.
This process shouldn't be about simply winning the next election and removing Rachel Notley from power. Uniting the two parties needs to be about building a new party that is principled, accountable to grassroots members and the people of Alberta, and focused on improving the lives of everyday Albertans.
Jason Kenney has assured Albertans that even though his campaign isn't obligated to follow the rules everything would be above board. However, Kenney's campaign has chosen to go with the least transparent organizational structure available and Kenney has publicly misidentified Unite Alberta as a non-profit.
The 2015 political donations were out this week and they contained some numbers that should cause a bit of unease. It's not just the 2015 amounts that are of interest, it's the running totals as well. Since 2005, the B.C. Liberal party has raised more than $107.8 million -- $70.2 million of that from businesses and corporations.
As you might imagine the Alberta Prosperity Fund poll finds a small majority, 52 per cent, would vote for a newly formed PC/Wildrose party. Maggi is the CEO of Mainstreet Research, the pollster for Postmedia and he correctly called the majorities for both the federal Liberals and the provincial New Democrats. He has three major concerns.
The big surprise with the NDP's breakthrough is Alberta is seen as the country's most conservative province. Home of the oil sands, Stephen Harper, and the Wildrose party, there's plenty of evidence to back this up. But, Calgary and Edmonton both have progressive mayors, Alberta is the youngest province demographically, and Albertans are feeling the economic (not to mention environmental) downside to an oil dependent economy. Rachel Notley reminded everyone that Alberta is defined by... Alberta.
They could only watch as their dynasty drowned beneath an orange wave.
What is happening in Alberta? Conservatives, after all, are a constant in the prairie province. As certain as the Bow River swells every spring, Albertans habitually re-elect Progressive Conservatives.
Not so long ago, Smith vilified the Progressive Party, branding it as tired, washed up, and spiralling out of control. Alberta faced certain disaster if Progressive Conservatives continued their uninterrupted reign. Smith was fervent. Committed. She would burn down the village to save it.
Two short months ago, the Wildrose party was riding high. What could possibly go wrong? Jim Prentice, that's what.