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anti-gay discrimination

Over the last few weeks, while dressed in plainclothes -- though they promise it was work-related -- police officers approached certain individuals in Etobicoke's Marie Curtis Park and signalled that they were interested in getting it on. Project Marie represents the historical clash between so-called family values and gay fun that has been an endless source of discrimination and homophobia.
Since the 1980s, it's been used to diminish and discredit efforts to reduce racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia, ableism and other forms of discrimination. But despite people like Donald Trump declaring "I'm so tired of this politically correct crap," the efforts remain because the issues have not gone away.
Prior to the 1970s, house parties were an essential element of the homosexual social scene. Photographs of these private affairs are rare. The few that are available in archival collections memorialize a history of forced seclusion. One of the most tantalizing photographs I've come across in my research of Canadian LGBT history is of a trio of men attending a Christmas party in 1956. Standing in front of a decorated tree, a young man with a then-stylish pompadour delights in opening his gift while another man, who has his arm around him and another gentleman, looks on.
A minority is defined as dangerous by a segment of society that clings to traditional views of acceptability. They fail to recognize prejudices inherent in their views until a hard-won fight for equal rights and shifting zeitgeist forces them to move on, foisting their fears on the next marginalized group.
Students who can't go to TWU can still go to another law school. But there are no competing law societies to turn to if the government-authorized body bars your way. It should be the marketplace that determines who practices law and who doesn't.
If a religion preaches discrimination against another? Would not supporting freedom of religion, in this case, be then a force for discrimination? While many people may not recognize this -- or wish to recognize this -- this was also a real concern when the concept of freedom of religion first arose in force. Is a religious practice inherently discriminatory or is this possible discrimination simply a side-result of the action, essentially undertaken for other reasons? The fact is that rights of individuals often invariably collide.
Seventy per cent of students hear, "That's so gay" every day in school; 48 per cent reported hearing words like "faggot" or "dyke" every day; 58 per cent of straight students reported that they find homophobic comments upsetting; 64 per cent of LGBTQ students and 61 per cent of students with LGBTQ parents reported that they felt unsafe in school.
Let's not let our fight for equal rights be clouded by the fact that LGBT people can get married across our great nation (and a number of U.S. states). In many countries, homosexuality is still illegal and punishable by imprisonment or death. People who are still fighting for basic rights and freedoms need our help.
In 1947, the Saskatchewan Legislature passed The Saskatchewan Bill of Rights Act, and the difficult task of balancing freedoms