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Ashley Madison

Talk about a catch-22.
Finally, something good comes out of the Ashley Madison scandal.
It is generally assumed that aversion to risk is one of the biggest obstacles to Canadian innovation, but only 10 per cent of Canadian businesses are truly risk averse. The big issue is apparently an inability to align risk-taking with financial capacity -- rational risk-taking obviously involves being able to survive the potential negative consequences of your actions. And that's a key lesson buried in the aftermath of the hacker attack on the controversial Ashley Madison online affair service.
I am not by any means condoning Josh Duggar's behaviour. His actions have been reprehensible. What I am doing is pointing out an all too familiar calling card that has been handed out time and time again by the same backwards religious fanatics that America calls its own. Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar have failed utterly as parents by refraining from doing one thing: protecting their children.
Despite a hack attack that exposed info on some 37 million accounts, Ashley Madison says it’s growing. “Recent media reports
The CEO of Ashley Madison owner Avid Life Media has resigned in the wake of a hack attack that saw data on 37 million subscribers
A detailed look at leaked Ashley Madison data suggests there were practically no women active on the site. It was already
Ashley Madison had the honesty to say it is for married people to have affairs as opposed to encourage married and partnered people to pretend they're single. And for that their customers have had their personal information, including apparently credit card information, released?
Avid Life Media, the Toronto-based owner of Ashley Madison, worked to develop an app called “What’s Your Wife Worth,” according
Ashley Madison caters to married people and the motto of the site is "Life is short. Have an affair." This leads us to bigger questions regarding relationships and an examination of why a "cheating" website has such a huge number of users. What does this have to say about the modern state of marriage and monogamy?