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athletes

During the Olympics, you heard stories of athletes who sustained serious injuries and are back at their sport. But what about when the injuries hit close to home affecting your kids, your friends or yourself? The future is unknown when it comes to injuries and can be filled with chronic pain, disability and rehabilitation. So how can we prevent sport-related injuries?
Last night, tennis fans sat riveted in front of their TV screens, watching 19-year-old Canadian, Eugenie Bouchard, beat former world No. 1 Ana Ivanovic and triumphantly reach the semifinals of the Australian Open. And after that exhilarating and shocking victory, what did the on-court interviewer ask this dedicated and amazing athlete? Who's the man of your dreams, Eugenie? Who are you crushing on, girl? Because, being a woman, what else could she possibly be interested in? Entrenched sexism needs to be pointed out, ridiculed, and eradicated.
There have been a lot of comparisons made over the last week or so between Abercrombie & Fitch founder, Mike "We only like the cool kids" Jeffries and Lululemon founder, Chip "Our designs aren't flawed, your bodies are" Wilson. But there's one big difference between these two clothing moguls
Parenting athletes, Louis C.K. on cell phones, mobile strategies, foodie travel and mass shootings all caught my attention this week.
The message that we're sending to our children is loud and clear: we want you to excel at sports, so you'd better do it. We want to see you become an athletic star, regardless of your interest (and often skill level). Until we let go of our collective dreams of athletic super-stardom, of touchdowns and home runs, we will continue to negatively affect our children's psyches.
Sports celebs as liars, a seven-year-old girl on a diet, the quinoa question and hockey rules. There was a lot of good stuff that caught my attention this week.
What is it that makes some athletes persevere while others give up? What drives an athlete at all? It's of course impossible to know if an athlete will 'make it' until they actually do but, in my mind, the root of this perseverance is planted in four simple things: a love of the sport, the desire to improve, being satisfied with small, incremental improvements and patience. In a word -- grit.
As the 100th Grey Cup looms, it's hard not to think of the glorious moments of our country's diverse athletic past. While
Even with the Olympics on 24/7 (admittedly a huge distraction for me) there was a lot that caught my attention this week. Let's talk about the Olympic uniforms, Twitter and freedom of speech, and ways that you can eat like an athlete!
We've grown accustomed to seeing actors, actresses and musicians on the red carpet. But what about those who can not only