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auditor general report

How long does it take the Ontario Government from the time they decide a program is needed until they actually finalize implementation? It sounds like a joke but it isn't and it is one issue raised in the 2016 Ontario Auditor General's report. The answer is close to three decades provided there are no further missteps and/or delays.
According to Michael Ferguson's latest audit, the Army Reserve is clearly lacking "clear guidance on preparing for international missions, had lower levels of training as cohesive teams, and had not fully integrated this training with that of the Regular Army." Adding to that, the number of reservists is lower than needed and are not fully prepared to deploy when required.
Leo Housakos said it was unfortunate that he had to respond to “unfounded, unsubstantiated allegations being made by un-named sources.”
”These leaks violate all senators' fundamental right to the presumption of innocence and due process.”
Is it really that surprising that students prefer inexpensive fast-food meals like a burger and fries, instead of overpriced and smaller portioned salads from government-approved cafeteria menus? Like Homer Simpson taught his daughter Lisa, "You don't win friends with salad!" And the government's healthy menus program is certainly not winning any friends in Ontario's high schools.
Allegations of expense scandals in the Senate have shocked many Canadians and rightfully so. Although unsettling, such antics are not an isolated case; they are part of a larger institutional problem with government.
Can government really deliver? Evidence suggests the answer is a resounding "no." This is plain to see for anyone who peruses the catalogue of reports from Canada's Office of the Auditor General, an independent federal body charged with reporting to parliament on the performance of various government programs and initiatives. We did just that -- and it's not a pretty picture. It's hard to imagine a private company staying in business for long if it behaved this way. But therein lies the problem. Unlike a private company, a government can't go out of business. And government typically operates in a monopoly environment protected from competition so the consequences of mistakes and inefficiencies tend to persist.
Auditor General Michael Ferguson, in his spring report released Tuesday, said the military's persistent failure to buy new
The lack of information on spending and on results achieved for money spent is a common theme throughout Ferguson's report
OTTAWA — The auditor general is expected to deliver his report card on the efficient administration of the House of Commons