HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

autistic children

A new American study has confirmed what every autism family has heard anecdotally: Accidental death by drowning is a significant risk for kids with autism. Researchers at the Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia University looked at more than 39 million death records over a 16-year period (up to 2014) to determine the relationship between autism and death by injury.
Heartbreaking.
Too often well-meaning journalists get it wrong when they write about autism. It's not so much the content of their stories that misses the mark as the language they use to describe autism itself. Reflecting on autism in a more nuanced manner using these basic pointers can help you avoid simplistic depictions and understand the true, lived experiences of those on the autism spectrum and those who support them.
So much love.
“Sam never thought he would be able to work behind the bar but his manager Chris believed in him."
Christmas is just around the corner - the hustle and bustle of going from store to store; the magic in the air; the joy of
Let's say parents decide that it is time for that new mattress purchase for themselves, their child or both. It can be daunting or near impossible to go into a mattress store, any store, with their special needs child. Here are a few questions you can ask yourself about buying the perfect mattress for you or your child's sleep needs
Ah, that first visit to Santa. Remember how your little one cried and was scared, clinging to you? But you knew that this was temporary. Next year, he/she would be fine with the Santa visit, a rite of passage for most North American children today. But what if your child is not like all the other children?
Back to school. Three words that evoke dread in most kids and many more parents. While there were some definite ups, my son's introduction to school life a couple years ago was a fairly rocky one. So in an attempt to make this year's transition smoother, I'm determined to get a head start.
Many organizations and affected families across the country have been calling for a national autism strategy. The wide range in disparity of publicly funded services for autism across the country has even generated a kind of "medical migration" with several published accounts of families leaving their home provinces (most commonly, Atlantic provinces, Ontario and Quebec) to move to Alberta or British Columbia where autism services are more readily available and/or more flexible. It is also no longer uncommon to find Canadian families using crowdsourcing campaigns to fund their children's autism and related therapies.