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autonomous cars

"Autonomous Vehicles" (AV') - recall a futuristic scene with robots delivering your mail and drones dropping the latest smartphone
One of the most exciting commitments coming from the auto and technology makers during CES 2017 is the ambition to realize driverless car capability for city streets as early as 2020.
Much as the manual transmission has all but disappeared in the 21st Century, the idea of driving a car in the manner of a Steve McQueen may soon also be a thing of the past. Autonomous features will almost assuredly become mandatory -- and switching them off could become a too-expensive option.
Self-driving cars have really been featured in the headlines over the past year. Whether it's the Google car that drives itself, or the projection that "robot" cars will be mass manufactured in just ten years. But what trends will the self-driving car bring about?
If there was still any doubt that driverless cars are happening, the news coming out of the world's automakers this week
The majority of Canadians believe driverless car technology will result in fewer accidents, speeding and drunk driving. Advancements in electronics that will make the driverless car a reality are certainly the talk of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES 2016).
With "Future Day" a week away, there have been many recent articles on "What Did Back To The Future Get Right?" Rather than bore you with a typical comparison, I thought I'd take a different approach, and highlight how both the BTTF trilogy and Demolition Man made technological predictions of a more inclusive and accessible world.
In a near future where a fleet of driverless taxis could be at your beck and call, what public transit will we need? If your
Premier Kathleen Wynne's solution to the transportation infrastructure problem is to spend a whopping $50 billion of taxpayer money over the next 25 years to build an expansive rail network. By 2040, Toronto may finally have the subways that other cities built nearly 200 years earlier. But can you imagine what the world will look like in 2040? We are on the cusp of explosive new technologies that will revolutionize how we commute. Innovative tech startups are fixing the problems we currently have with cars: that they pollute too much, are too expensive for many, and congest our overcrowded roads. Here are three notable examples of ideas and companies that will change transportation as we know it.