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bc green party

Days before U.S. President Donald Trump announced the U.S.'s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, opposition party leaders in B.C. inked an accord that has the potential to, among other things, jumpstart clean growth and green jobs in Canada's westernmost province.
British Columbia could soon be the second Canadian province to try out a basic income.
Behind the politics, the rhetoric, the spin and the muckraking, there are people. People of passion and who desire to fight for what they believe in. If we cannot build bridges and learn to understand those with whom we most deeply disagree, we will never be able to come together and change things in this province.
Earlier this month the 2016 donation numbers for B.C.'s political parties were filed with Elections B.C. and, not unexpectedly, it was another bumper crop for the B.C. Liberals. The party raised $13.1 million, more than any other provincial party in Canada and $4.8 million more than the federal NDP and Green Party combined.
The B.C. Liberals' re-election strategy was to campaign, as they say, "from the right," by touting their record on jobs and economic prosperity. Party stalwarts I spoke to on election night agree that sticking to their tried-and-true economic message box may have cost the B.C. Liberals their majority in the Legislature.
Many Liberal and Green voters who rejected John Horgan's strategic voting appeals did so to prevent a B.C. credit crisis. Thanks to a near-tie in seats between the other two parties, the B.C. Greens could both meet their progressive goals and prevent a future credit crisis by forcing the NDP to pull back on spending targets.
Considering how important cannabis is to our province in every way, it's surprising that legalization hasn't been a bigger topic in this election. Legalization could be a big boon for B.C., or it could be a devastating blow to our provincial economy. We need a premier who will get it right.
Nicola Spurling said she wasn't contacted directly for the story.
With so many issues commanding headlines at the start of the provincial election campaign, it is easy to understand how caring for frail and elderly citizens can drop off the public's radar. For many British Columbians, however, there can be no more important issue than the availability of care for their elderly loved one.
The B.C. Liberals head into an election under the weight of a political donation scandal.