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BC Lottery Corporation

The BC Lottery Corporation's big schmooze-and-booze conference should have taxpayers, who pick up the tab, singing the blues. BCLC lost $208,642 on its 2016 New Horizons in Responsible Gaming conference. The conference attracted only 85 paid registrants.
Another vacancy in a public boardroom and another B.C. Liberal party supporter ready and willing to fill it. News that Frank Carson -- a partner at Victoria law firm Cox, Taylor -- was appointed chair of B.C. Transit's board of directors last week was met with the expected cynicism.
Petty. One word that springs to mind after last week's B.C. budget. At best, it's a lip service budget. Tweak here, tweak
health ministry firings, multicultural outreach strategy and what some are calling deletegate -- they demand finesse and there's a definite pattern to how the government goes about it. Its damage control manual seems to come with instructions: mix and match to fit, use sparingly and only as required.
In the spirit of giving, here are five ideas for B.C.'s politicians to consider as they set their resolutions for 2015.
If cabinet ministers had theme songs, B.C. Finance Minister Mike de Jong's would likely be "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen," because when there's a misstep in government it's a safe bet he'll be troubled by it.
The intertwining of lobbyists with a political party's fundraising apparatus is worrisome, because ultimately both sides risk developing a dependency on keeping the other happy and the money flowing. It rarely ends well.
The funny thing about provincial budgets is that sometimes they tell you a lot more about a government's attitude than what the politicians might have intended when they first wrote the document.
Legislative oversight is fundamental to good government. And with less and less of it, the government does more and more by decree. B.C. isn't well-served by that. In 2012, the B.C. legislature sat for 47 days. Among its numerous legislative duties: to debate and approve a $44-billion budget. Forty-seven days is simply insufficient to do that and everything else well.