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BC mining

Why are we not questioning the cost (both financially and socially) of our current Liberal government's policies? The cost aspect of a promise or platform is a justified question, but only if you hold every party to the same scrutiny.
Eighty-six per cent of people in B.C. support banning corporate and union donations, with 76 per cent agreeing that the B.C. Liberals are only interested in helping their political donors and big businesses. The majority of us know that people don't just give away hundreds of thousands of dollars without expecting anything in return.
It is still unknown what the long-term effects will be, and numerous local families and businesses have suffered great losses and hardship. Many of us doubt we can be made whole again -- by the mine or the province.
Twenty years ago when someone said "Clayoquot," protests against clearcutting of old growth forests came to mind. At that time nobody thought anybody was crazy enough to propose an open-pit copper mine in the heart of Clayoquot Sound.
The underground mine, which has not yet received federal approval, will be close to the headwaters of the Unuk River, which flows from B.C. into Alaska. The Unuk is one of southeast Alaska's largest king (chinook) salmon rivers.
"It's a totally different design in terms of the tailings storage facility itself."
If the government is serious about stimulating investor confidence in the mining sector, they need to address the land certainty question.
At this moment in time, all we really know is that the status quo in our mining industry cannot go on.
It's one thing to seek to learn from a disaster and it's another thing to incite emotional responses to promote hasty, unwise public policy actions. Despite the fact that virtually nothing was known about the cause of the Mount Polley leak, only two days after the spill, the David Suzuki Foundation had set up an automatic petition portal on their website calling on the province to institute a moratorium on new mine approvals, a suggestion that would imperil a substantial part of B.C.'s economy.
Fortune's actions pose risks for not only their project, but also for development elsewhere in our territory. If our values and rights aren't protected and respected in critical areas such as the Sacred Headwaters, we will view the risks of development as far outweighing the benefits. Conflict could become the norm, not the exception.