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B.C. Supreme Court

I want my daughter's best interests to be represented by the numerous disability rights organizations that have appeared in recent years. Sadly, these organizations, like the Council of Canadians with Disabilities, too often promote policies that pose real dangers to her. It's important to understand why a group like this would decide to hold these positions.
Because of the B.C. Liberal government's legislation in 2002 and again in 2012, thousands of students lost the opportunity to have a school psychologist assess their learning disabilities as well as the opportunity to have their learning needs supported by education assistants.
One would be hard-pressed to find a single government forecast for the Sea-to-Sky highway project ($195 million over its first estimate), the Port Mann or the South Fraser Perimeter Road that has been met.
When most communities in B.C. have more in-camera meetings than the City of Toronto, there's a problem. In Ontario, councils are entitled to go in-camera to consider six specific matters. There are four reasons that councils must go in camera and over a dozen reasons why they "may" close a meeting. The nuance between "may" and "must" seems to have been lost on a few.
The judge said the boy should not be punished for his stoicism.
If you think it’s okay to leave your children unsupervised, think again. A B.C. Supreme Court has ruled that children under
Her lawyers argued her choice to work as a dominatrix "shows a lack of correct thinking" as a result of the brain injury.
"Where are they going to park the cars? You're not going to park them in the middle of an avalanche zone."
It is time for Premier Clark to stop the Jumbo Glacier Resort gravy train and bring accountability and sanity to the situation once and for all.
B.C. is home to 75 per cent of Canada's bird species, 70 per cent of its freshwater fish species and 66 per cent of its butterfly species. More 1,900 of these species are at-risk. A staggering 87 per cent these don't receive any protection under provincial or federal laws.